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In a Snapshot, “Sea” the Future Today

Cuong Tran and Diana Lopera , UCS

They say that a picture can speak a thousand words … but what if the picture could paint a future 10, 50, 100 years from now? And not just a future that’ll impact one person, but rather the future that will impact many. Through the eyes of concerned community members and the power of community science, we find that things may be closer than they appear. Read more >

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Photo: Pixabay

Let the Children Breathe Particulate Matter: How the Trump Administration’s Polluted Policies Are Hurting Children

The administration is letting industries, power generators, and our transportation systems spew fine particulate matter and heavy metals straight into the lungs of our kids. This is not okay. Read more >

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Benjamin Cruz/Pexels

Exposure to Air Pollution from Vehicles in Illinois Is Inequitable — It Doesn’t Have to Be

, Senior vehicles engineer

Exposure to PM2.5 pollution from cars, trucks, and buses varies greatly within Illinois. Concentrations are highest in urban areas and downwind of those areas; Chicago and its immediate surroundings are affected the most. Cook County, including Chicago, not only has the state’s highest PM2.5 pollution exposure, but it also is one of the nation’s worst affected counties. Read more >

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La contaminación del aire causada por los vehículos en Illinois es injusta, y no tiene porqué serlo

, Senior vehicles engineer

Los autos, camiones y buses son fuentes significativas de contaminación del aire en Illinois.  Pero, ¿cuanta de esta contaminación es atribuible a estos vehículos?, y ¿quiénes están expuestos a ella?

Para ayudarme a responder esta pregunta, he usado un modelo computarizado para estimar la cantidad de partículas finas de materia que causan la contaminación del aire (conocida como PM2.5) que resulta del uso de vehículos en carretera (autos, camiones y buses.)  Read more >

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Beginning a Courageous Journey: Connecting Science & Justice

Dr. Brian R. Shmaefsky , UCS

One year after the Flint Water Crisis I was invited to participate in a water rights session at a conference hosted by the US Human Rights Network in Austin, Texas in 2015. The reason I was at the conference was to promote efforts by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to encourage scientists to shine a light on how science intersects with human rights, in the United States as well as in the context of international development. My plan was to sit at an information booth and share my stories about water quality projects I spearheaded in communities in Bangladesh, Colombia, and the Philippines. I did not expect to be thrown into conversations that made me reexamine how scientists use their knowledge as a public good. Read more >

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