Astrid Caldas

Climate scientist

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Astrid Caldas is a climate scientist with the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Her research focuses on climate change adaptation with practical policy implications for ecosystems, the economy, and society. See Astrid's full bio.

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Hurricane Dennis/US Navy

Real-Time Lessons on COVID-19 and US Hurricane Response: What We’ve Learned from Hanna and Isaias

This hurricane season is particularly unique in a couple of ways – not only has it had various earliest named storms, but it is happening amidst a pandemic. The novel coronavirus is everywhere in the U.S. and in the world, and to respond to a disaster under the threat of contagion is nothing short of an extraordinary challenge. Read more >

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Temporada peligrosa de huracanes comienza en medio de pandemia COVID-19

COVID-19 nos tomó por asalto, pero probablemente no será la única amenaza que veremos este año. Read more >

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Dangerous Hurricane Season To Open Amidst COVID-19

COVID-19 took us by storm but likely won’t be the only storm we will see this year.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has just released its Atlantic hurricane season outlook for 2020, forecasting an above-average hurricane season with 13-19 named storms, of which 6-10 could turn into hurricanes. Of these hurricanes, 3-6 could become major. If the outlook projections materialize, 2020 would be the fifth year in a row with above-normal tropical cyclone activity. In addition, the NOAA outlook comes on the heels of the first named Atlantic tropical storm of the season, Arthur, which – for the sixth year in a row – formed before the official start of hurricane season, June 1.

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https://github.com/shaman-lab/COVID-19Projection
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Highlights, Firsts and Worsts of Hurricane Season 2019 and the Future of Hurricanes

Hurricane season ended on November 30, but not before Hurricane Dorian had decimated the Bahamas, taking lives and setting their infrastructure and economy back, potentially for years. On U.S. soil, Hurricane Barry and Tropical Storm Imelda had flooded Texas and the Carolinas, leaving billions in damage.

All told, Hurricane Season 2019 storms were stronger, more rapidly intensifying, slower-moving, and dumped a lot of rain. And this trend may continue if no action is taken to combat climate change. Read more >

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NOAA
NOAA
Kerry Emanuel, MIT
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Photo: Alexander Gerst/Flickr

Hurricane Season 2019: Global Warming, Forecasts, and Probabilities

According to NASA, 2018 was the 4th warmest year in a continued warming trend since record keeping began in the 1880’s, with temperatures 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit (0.83 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1951 to 1980 mean. And with it, a string of five consecutive years have been recorded as the five warmest on record. Is climate change having an effect on hurricane season, or on hurricanes themselves? Hurricane season starts on June 1st. Let’s take a look at the latest forecasts and science. Read more >

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