Maria Cecilia Pinto de Moura

Senior vehicles engineer

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Maria Cecilia Pinto de Moura is senior vehicles engineer for the Clean Vehicles program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In her role, Dr. Moura works to translate transportation energy and emissions analyses to regional policies that will reduce emissions from transportation in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. Dr. Moura also works with the UCS Climate & Energy modeling team on national transportations energy and emissions modeling. See Cecilia's full bio.

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TCI Health Study Shows Benefits, But More Needed to Address Inequitable Air Pollution

Communities across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. could see substantial health improvements from just modest changes in air quality, according to a new preliminary study released by a team of researchers from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston University School of Public Health and the University of North Carolina. By investing in clean transportation solutions such as enhanced transit, safe and bikeable streets, and vehicle electrification, states in the region would not only experience lower greenhouse gas emissions, but also a drop in local air pollution. At a time when clean air is desperately needed, the health benefits of the proposed program are a step in the right direction, but we will need significant complementary policies to bring us into a truly equitable clean transportation future.
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COVID-19, Air Pollution and Health Impacts: An Interview with Pediatric Pulmonologist Dr. Denise Serebrisky

Maria Cecilia Pinto de Moura, a senior vehicles engineer for the Clean Vehicles program interviews Dr. Denise Serebrisky, a frontline pediatric pulmonologist at Jacobi hospital in the Bronx, to learn about how pre-existing diseases affect her COVID-19 patients, and how air pollution causes or worsens several of those very same diseases. Read more >

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Numbers that Take Your Breath Away: COVID-19, Air Pollution, and Equity

Human beings have been challenged by microorganisms for centuries:  the bubonic plague, smallpox, measles, influenza, Marburg, rabies, HIV, Ebola, dengue, SARS, the Middle East respiratory syndrome, and many others. However, we can limit the severity of future outbreaks of deadly diseases, and we can reduce and eventually eliminate the disproportionate impact of these diseases on people of color, by building a robust health system for all, enforcing air pollution regulations, and supporting science and scientists. Read more >

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A ride-hailing app on an iPhone
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Cinco Cosas que Debes Saber la Próxima Vez que Pidas un Lyft o un Uber

Los servicios de transporte a través de app, como Lyft y Uber, han cambiado la manera en que las personas se trasladan de un lugar a otro. Mis compañeros y yo acabamos de publicar un informe estimando las emisiones de carbono asociadas a los viajes por estas apps de transporte. Los hallazgos son preocupantes, y hacemos recomendaciones para mejorar nuestras opciones de transporte sin aumentar la contaminación y la congestión. Read more >

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Who Breathes the Dirtiest Air from Vehicles in Minnesota?

Most people know that cars, trucks, and buses from our highways and city streets are a significant source of harmful air pollution. While this pollution impacts all communities in the state to some degree, Minnesotans who face the greatest exposure to transportation pollution are those who live near highways, along major freight corridors, and in urban areas.

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