Daniel Gatti

Policy analyst

Author image
Daniel Gatti is a policy analyst for the Clean Vehicles program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Gatti’s work is focused on efforts to reduce emissions in the transportation sector in the Northeast region, through electrification, efficiency, and clean fuels. See Daniel's full bio.

Subscribe to Daniel's posts

Daniel's Latest Posts

Sarah Nichols/Flickr

TCI is a Strategy to Enforce Limits on Transportation Pollution

The Baker administration may be on the verge of leading the Northeast towards a major advance in climate policy.

The Transportation and Climate Initiative (TCI), if successful, would establish the region’s first mandatory and enforceable limits on pollution from transportation, now the largest source of emissions.in Massachusetts and the Northeast.

Read more >

Sarah Nichols/Flickr
Bookmark and Share

Photo: Zach Miles/Unsplash

Here’s Why New York Should Pass the CCPA

New York State is on the verge of passing one of the nation’s most ambitious economy-wide climate laws.

The Community and Climate Protection Act, or CCPA, would not only require New York to achieve 100% clean electricity by 2040, but also pave the way for the complete transition of New York’s economy to clean energy. The CCPA is the result of years of work by grassroots activists and leaders within the New York Renews coalition, demonstrating that with persistence and determination, momentum on the ground has the potential to achieve big things in climate policy.

Read more >

Photo: Zach Miles/Unsplash
Bookmark and Share

Make Electric Vehicle Rebates Available at the Point of Purchase

New legislation proposed in Massachusetts would take a critical step towards making electric vehicles (EVs) affordable to consumers, by offering rebates to consumers at the point of sale.

Read more >

Grendelkhan/Wikimedia Commons
Bookmark and Share

Photo: Shutterstock/Standret

Rural Drivers Can Save the Most From Clean Vehicles

The transition to clean vehicle technologies such as electric vehicles will benefit consumers everywhere, promising lower operating and maintenance costs, along with less pollution and a cleaner environment. But the drivers with the greatest economic potential to gain by purchasing an electric vehicle are the residents of small towns and rural counties. Drivers living outside of urban areas often have farther to travel to work, shop, and visit a doctor. They have to repair their vehicles more frequently, they produce more carbon emissions per capita, and they spend more money on gasoline. As a result, rural drivers have the greatest potential to save money by making the switch to an electric vehicle. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Photo: John Cameron/Unsplash

Massachusetts Needs More Than MOR-EV

The good news coming out of Massachusetts electric vehicle policy is that the MOR-EV rebate program, the primary incentive that the Commonwealth offers to support vehicle electrification, will be extended into 2019. The bad news is that with this new batch of funding comes new limitations designed to reduce the speed at which the program drains money. Read more >

Bookmark and Share