Gretchen Goldman

Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

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Gretchen Goldman is a research director in the Center for Science and Democracy at UCS. She holds a PhD and MS in environmental engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a BS in atmospheric science from Cornell University. See Gretchen's full bio.

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Gretchen's Latest Posts

Six Things You Should Know About The EPA’s New Science Restriction Draft Policy

Yesterday, the EPA unveiled a long-awaited policy changing how the EPA can use science in its decision making. Ostensibly about “transparency”, the policy will actually restrict the agency’s ability to use the best available science—and thereby weaken protections for public health and the environment. Read more >

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Brace Yourself for Unhealthy Air: The Trump Administration Weakens Clean Air Protections

The president’s order is bad news for anyone that breathes air in this country. Read more >

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New Report: One Year In, EPA Chemical Rule Delay Allows Chemical Disasters to Continue

While news this week suggests that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is a walking ethics disaster, he’s long been paving the way for actual disasters—chemical disasters that is. A report released today, A Disaster in the Making, by community, environmental, health, workers, and scientist groups, illuminates how Pruitt’s unnecessary delay of the Chemical Disaster Rule continues to harm Americans. Read more >

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Scott Pruitt Will Restrict the EPA’s Use of Legitimate Science

The EPA is reportedly on the verge of restricting the science that EPA can use in decision-making and I’m livid. Read more >

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Five Things We’ve Learned from Surveys of Government Scientists

This month the Union of Concerned Scientists is surveying government scientists—about 63,000 of them from 16 federal agencies, to be exact. Since these scientists get emails from me requesting their time and perspectives, I want to discuss the value of the scientific integrity surveys we’ve been conducting here for many years. Since 2005, thousands of scientists have responded to UCS surveys and that information has led to concrete changes at federal agencies. Here’s a sampling of what we’ve gained from surveying government scientists. Read more >

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