Jonna Hamilton

Sr. Manager of Government Affairs

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Jonna Hamilton is the Senior Manager of Government Affairs in the Clean Vehicles Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). In that role, she leads interactions with Congress, executive branch agencies, and the White House on topics pertaining to fuel efficient cars, electric vehicles, and fuels policy. See Jonna's full bio.

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Jonna's Latest Posts

Industry Representatives and Administrator Pruitt looking quite pleased at the press conference where they rolled out their rollback of the fuel efficiency standards. Left to right - Peter Welch, NADA, Administrator Pruitt, Mitch Bainwal, Alliance, John Bozzella, Global. Screenshot from C-SPAN

5 Things the EPA Gets Wrong as it Re-Evaluates the Fuel Efficiency Standards (and One Thing it Ignores)

On Monday April 2nd, the EPA released a “redetermination” of the incredibly popular and successful car and light truck global warming emissions standards – spoiler alert – EPA said that the standards are not appropriate and need to be weakened. The redetermination is full of questionable assumptions and strange conclusions. We picked five falsehoods that are core to their reasoning and explain why they’re wrong. Read more >

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That shiny new truck could have a 15-year-old engine that doesn’t meet today’s standards, and you might never know…except for the plumes of pollution behind it, if it’s a glider vehicle. Photo: Jeremy Rempel. CC-BY-ND 2.0 (Flickr)

Scientists Stand Up Against Shoddy Science on Glider Vehicles

Glider vehicles have gone from being a niche issue to a major conversation piece both here in DC and now also in Tennessee.  The villains are still Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, Fitzgerald Glider Kits, and Congresswoman Diane Black.  The new heroes are the Tennessee Tech University (TTU) faculty and students. Read more >

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Is Your Representative Setting Us Up for Another Dieselgate?

[Update, 10/25/17, 11:45am: Click here to tell Congress to stop Diselgate 2.0]

Remember dieselgate? The Volkswagen scandal that led to huge emissions of harmful air pollution from their cars, criminal charges, and a $30 billion mea culpa? Well, dieselgate may be small compared to the new emissions scandal that is playing out across the country. This time, however, the emissions cheating would be explicitly allowed by Congress. Read more >

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