Julie McNamara

Energy analyst

Author image
Julie McNamara is an energy analyst with the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In her role, she analyzes state, regional, and national policies relating to clean energy development and deployment. Ms. McNamara holds an M.S. in technology and policy from MIT, and a B.A. in biology and political economy from Williams College. See Julie's full bio.

Subscribe to Julie's posts

Julie's Latest Posts

Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Scott Pruitt’s Incredible, Perpetual, Public Time-Wasting Machine

How low can this man go… Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Photo: Western Area Power/CC BY (Flickr)

Spate of Nor’easters Rips Down Wires, Sparks Calls to Do Better

Two weeks, and three jarring reminders of how dependent we are on the power grid—and just how vulnerable that grid is to failure. Let now be a reminder that we can and must do better. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons (Flickr)

Scott Pruitt Ensnares the Clean Power Plan in More Red Tape

For a man who swears to be laser-focused on ridding the world of regulatory red tape, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt sure has a funny way of showing it.

Indeed, Mr. Pruitt appears to be something of a red tape-generating savant.

Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Photo: San Juan Citizens Alliance/EcoFlight

Making the Leap from Coal to What Could Be: New Mexico’s Energy Future

After decades and decades of commitment to coal, New Mexico is rapidly heading toward a future that’s coal free.

Read more >

Mr.TinDC/Creative Commons (Flickr)
Bookmark and Share

How One Utility Is Using Tax Reform to Hide a Billion-Dollar Climate Problem

Picture this: You’ve just completed a decade of investing about $3 billion of your customers’ dollars into keeping the lights on when severe weather strikes. Now Hurricane Irma’s blasted through, 90 percent of your customers were left in the dark, and the restoration and repair costs you intend to bill them are estimated at $1.3 billion.

That’s right. A storm you’ve spent a decade preparing for is looking like it’ll end up costing nearly half as much as the preparations themselves. Worse, there’s no reason to think it won’t keep happening again, and again, and again, as climate change drives the intensity of these storms ever higher.

Bit of a thorny customer relations problem, that one.

Read more >

NOAA 2017
Bookmark and Share