Michael Latner

Kendall Science Fellow

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Michael Latner is a Kendall Voting Rights Fellow with the Center for Science and Democracy. His research focuses on political representation and electoral systems. His most recent work has focused on redistricting and gerrymandering in the United States, and the impact of electoral administrative law on political participation. Michael holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California at Irvine, and is an associate professor of political science at California State Polytechnic University, where he recently directed the Masters in Public Policy program. See Michael's full bio.

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Science and the Law: Two Pillars of Truth Intersect at Political Boundaries

2018 is promising to be far more consequential than your average midterm election year. A number of landmark Supreme Court and state court decisions could literally transform parts of the country’s political landscape.  Read more >

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Standing Ground: The State of Voting Rights in Year One of the Trump Administration

On January 20th, 2017, Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of these United States.  By the time the president-elect had actually taken office, he had already put into motion his intent to see through a radical transformation of the nation’s electoral laws.  Mr. Trump’s nomination of Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions as Attorney General, his collaboration with Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to establish an “electoral integrity” commission, and his nomination of a series of controversial judicial appointees soon after inauguration, all reflected an extension of his campaign’s attacks on the integrity of U.S. elections.

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Michael Fleshman
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The Science of Sovereignty: Two Cases Show How the Future of Voting Rights Depends on the Integrity of Data

This week, two major court cases concerning the right to an equal and effective vote revealed how crucial scientific integrity in the courts is going to be if voting rights are to be secured for all Americans. Read more >

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Data Integrity and Voting Rights: Will the Supreme Court Protect the Right to Not Vote?

The first major voting rights case of the year comes before the Supreme Court Wednesday, when Justices hear arguments over the state of Ohio’s “supplemental process” for removing people from voter registration lists. The case is important procedurally and politically. Read more >

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Virginia’s Gerrymander Is Still Alive—and a Deadly Threat to Environmental Justice

This week, Virginia’s Board of Elections certified results from the November 7th elections, paving the way for three crucial recounts that will determine control of the Virginia House. The Democratic Party would need to take two of those seats for a majority, having already defeated more than a dozen incumbent Republicans and flipping three seats. If this wave is enough to push the Democratic Party over the 50-seat mark, many in the press will declare that the Virginia GOP’s gerrymandered districting plan is no more. But they will be wrong. Read more >

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