Science and Democracy

The partnership between science and democracy has played a huge role in U.S. history. But misinformation and attacks on science have strained that partnership. UCS science and democracy experts keep you informed on the latest developments, from Capitol Hill to local communities.


Subscribe to our Science and Democracy feed

Latest Science and Democracy Posts

Photo: Loco Steve/Flickr

With New Manipulation of Benefit-Cost Analysis, the Trump EPA Attempts to Hide Bodies in the Fine Print

, Senior Energy analyst

Here, now, the agency with its mission to protect human health and the environment is attempting to shovel tens of thousands of pollution-caused deaths off the main page and into the margins to make regulatory inaction pencil out. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

10 Things That the Scholarly Community Can Do to Stand in Solidarity

Acknowledge the history. Revise your work. Refuse to be complicit. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Elvert Barnes/Flickr

“Fattening” the Curve: Funding Equitable Scientific Research After the Pandemic

Barbara Allen, Professor, , UCS

After the pandemic subsides, we need to build reliable knowledge on the ground about successes and failures in “flattening the curve” in the hardest hit communities during the early phase of the pandemic. What social rhythms were disrupted and what suggested behavior modifications were difficult?  Were they related to infrastructure (i.e. running water, transportation), patterns of financial support (i.e. hazardous employment, paydays), extended family living and caregiving, distrust of government, religious commitments, or other culturally specific activities? Read more >

Bookmark and Share

NASA

Temporada peligrosa de huracanes comienza en medio de pandemia COVID-19

, climate scientist

COVID-19 nos tomó por asalto, pero probablemente no será la única amenaza que veremos este año. Read more >

NASA
Bookmark and Share

NASA

Dangerous Hurricane Season To Open Amidst COVID-19

, climate scientist

COVID-19 took us by storm but likely won’t be the only storm we will see this year.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has just released its Atlantic hurricane season outlook for 2020, forecasting an above-average hurricane season with 13-19 named storms, of which 6-10 could turn into hurricanes. Of these hurricanes, 3-6 could become major. If the outlook projections materialize, 2020 would be the fifth year in a row with above-normal tropical cyclone activity. In addition, the NOAA outlook comes on the heels of the first named Atlantic tropical storm of the season, Arthur, which – for the sixth year in a row – formed before the official start of hurricane season, June 1.

Read more >

NASA
https://github.com/shaman-lab/COVID-19Projection
Bookmark and Share