Science and Democracy

The partnership between science and democracy has played a huge role in U.S. history. But misinformation and attacks on science have strained that partnership. UCS science and democracy experts keep you informed on the latest developments, from Capitol Hill to local communities.


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Latest Science and Democracy Posts

Pruitt’s War on the Planet and the EPA—and What Congress Can Do About It

, president

Thus far, he hasn’t had to account for his actions—but a moment of accountability is nearing. Read more >

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Virginia’s Gerrymander Is Still Alive—and a Deadly Threat to Environmental Justice

, Kendall Science Fellow

This week, Virginia’s Board of Elections certified results from the November 7th elections, paving the way for three crucial recounts that will determine control of the Virginia House. The Democratic Party would need to take two of those seats for a majority, having already defeated more than a dozen incumbent Republicans and flipping three seats. If this wave is enough to push the Democratic Party over the 50-seat mark, many in the press will declare that the Virginia GOP’s gerrymandered districting plan is no more. But they will be wrong. Read more >

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Photo: Samantha Chisholm Hatfield

Lessons from the Land and Water Songs to Heal

Samantha Chisholm Hatfield, PhD, , UCS

Recently, I was fortunate to be selected as an HJ Andrews Visiting Scholar, and was able to complete an HJ Andrews Scholar Writing residency, where I had the incredible opportunity to view the forest area through a Traditional Ecological Knowledge lens.

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A graduate student demonstrates how her tax burden would increase by nearly $10,000 if the House version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act became law. Photo: Amanda Rose

New Tax on Graduate Students Would Harm the US

, research scientist, Center for Science and Democracy

The Tax Cut and Jobs Act would make it difficult, if not impossible, for many of the brightest minds in America to enter into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, ultimately decreasing America’s international competitiveness in science and technology. Read more >

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Giving Thanks to Climate Researchers of the Federal Agencies

John B. Drake, , UCS

Most of my science career I worked for the Department of Energy as a climate modeler and numerical expert at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since my retirement in 2010 I have written a text on computational climate modeling and taught graduate level engineering classes on climate science at the University of Tennessee. I had the privilege of working with many talented and dedicated scientists and hate to see their work go unappreciated because climate has become such a politicized issue. Read more >

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