2016 election


Pseudoscience on Trial: The Spectacular Fall of President Trump’s Voter Fraud Thesis

, Kendall Science Fellow

On January 3, 2017, President Trump claimed that there was “substantial evidence” of voter fraud in the 2016 election, enough to have denied him a popular vote victory. The substance of this now infamous claim, that millions of non-citizens committed voter fraud, was examined closely in the just-concluded trial of Kris Kobach, Kansas Secretary of State, current gubernatorial candidate, and co-chair of the Electoral “Integrity” Commission that the president established, then abruptly dissolved when it faced legal accountability. Read more >

Photo: Erik (HASH) Hersman/CC BY 2.0 (Flickr)
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Plate of the Union—a 2016 Campaign for a Better Food and Farming System

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

I don’t need to tell you that 2016 hasn’t exactly been the presidential campaign year my colleagues and I imagined when we launched our “Plate of the Union” initiative last fall. The national conversation has taken a few detours (ahem) that have made it challenging to maintain a focus on issues that really matter to American families, like what’s for dinner and how it gets there. Read more >

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Experts and Voters Agree: We Need to Fix the Food System

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

Add three dozen leading food experts to the growing chorus calling for more and better government action to fix our broken food system. Read more >

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Earth to API—It’s 2016 (not 1916) and “Energy Voters” Want Renewables

, senior fuels engineer

Recent commercials funded by the American Petroleum Institute suggest expanded fossil fuel development will benefit “our children and our grandchildren”—an untruth that won’t work forever. Read more >

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Why Aren’t Presidential Candidates Talking about Food and Agriculture?

, Fellow, Food & Environment Program

With the first Democratic debate a week behind us and the election still over a year away, we’ve entered a long but important window to influence campaign conversation.

In last week’s debate, the candidates spoke for 101 minutes during which gun control was mentioned 40 times. Russia and Syria followed in a tight second with 36 mentions, clocking in above the economy, which got called out 30 times. The health of Americans—or more specifically, healthcare—came up less than half as frequently, but still garnered 13 mentions.

How many times did the candidates mention food or agriculture? Read more >

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