carbon tax


Photo: Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why is ExxonMobil Still Funding Climate Science Denier Groups?

, senior writer

A decade after pledging to end its support for climate science deniers, ExxonMobil gave $1.5 million last year to 11 think tanks and lobby groups that reject established climate science and openly oppose the oil and gas giant’s professed climate policy preferences, according to the company’s annual charitable giving report released this week.

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Photo: Mike Mozart/Flickr
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Rep. Steve Scalise and other ExxonMobil-funded House members routinely vote against a carbon tax despite the company’s avowed support for one. Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

ExxonMobil’s Support for a Carbon Tax is a Sham

, senior writer

ExxonMobil executives just had another opportunity to convince skeptics that their support for a carbon tax is genuine. Yes, the company has consistently paid lip service to a carbon tax since 2009. And yes, it is a founding member of the Climate Leadership Council—which supports a $40 per ton carbon tax—and it recently endorsed Americans for Carbon Dividends, a new bipartisan lobby group promoting a carbon tax that would return revenues to taxpayers. But more telling is the fact that the oil giant has never publicly supported a carbon tax bill and consistently funds members of Congress who oppose a carbon tax. How does that square with the company’s avowed position? It doesn’t. Read more >

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Can Republicans Find Their Voice on Climate Change via a Carbon Tax?

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

Earlier this week a group of conservative opinion leaders and experts launched the Climate Leadership Council, championing a national carbon tax to cut emissions and help achieve climate goals. Read more >

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How to Cut US Power Sector Emissions: New Analysis and Insights from Marrakech

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

I am in Marrakech, Morocco, where the second week of the annual international climate talks (or COP22) is just getting underway. Nations hope to continue the momentum created by the Paris Agreement despite concerns about the implications of the US election outcome. One big topic of conversation: how will nations increase their commitments to cut emissions, in line with the ambitious long term temperature and decarbonization goals that were agreed to last year? Read more >

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Obama’s Climate Legacy

, director of strategy & policy

Since his re-election, President Obama has made it clear that he sees action on climate change as a major piece of unfinished business from his first term. In his election night victory speech, he said he wants “our children to live in an America that isn’t burdened by debt; that isn’t weakened by inequality; that isn’t threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet.” Read more >

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