Clean Energy Jobs


Roland Balik/US Air Force

US Solar Industry Poised to Lose 114,000 Jobs and Counting from COVID through June

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

With the US and global economy in free-fall due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the renewable energy industry is hemorrhaging projects and jobs at a faster rate than the overall economy. As of the end of April, more than half a million US clean energy workers are now out of work, and the number is still climbing. What is increasingly clear is that if we don’t take immediate action to stem the bleeding, the US will lose a big chunk of what was one of the fastest growing sectors of our economy and, in the long term, could result in a serious setback in efforts to address climate change.

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U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik
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Fed, States Should Protect Clean Energy Jobs for Black and Latino Workers

, Western States Energy Manager and Senior Analyst

At least 316 million people in the United States (or 96% of the country) have been directed to stay home to halt the spread of COVID-19. Those who are not essential workers are likely using up more electricity at home than they normally would, so you might imagine that the energy sector could be one of the few industries to come out of this pandemic relatively unscathed.

That may be true for regulated electric utilities and the large scale projects that contract with them. But it hasn’t held true for the energy sector’s largest employer, the energy efficiency sector, which has seen major layoffs since the start of the pandemic. And the pandemic’s impacts could be even more severe for smaller programs diversifying the energy efficiency workforce through job training programs for youth, low-income communities, and people of color.

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Department of Energy/Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL
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Photo: BLM Oregon

Scientists Advocating for Climate Action in Oregon: Why we are stepping up and speaking out

Sharon C Delcambre, PhD, Visiting Instructor of Environmental Studies, University of Portland; Frank D. Granshaw, PhD, adjunct faculty in Geology and University Studies, Portland State University, , UCS

We are two climate scientists, currently teaching about climate change at two universities in Portland, Oregon. We are also two concerned scientists who understand the severe threats that climate change is posing to human well-being, as well as two concerned parents (and one concerned grandfather) who are worried about the future of climate extremes that our children and grandchildren must bear. As members of the UCS Science Network, this year we have used our voices as scientists and experts to speak with Oregon state legislators and advocate for strong climate action in Oregon. Here are our stories.

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Photo: BLM Oregon
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Major Job Losses in Renewable Energy if Current Tax Plan Passes

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

In March 2017, I testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee on how federal tax credits for renewable energy have been a key driver for the recent growth in the US wind and solar industries, creating new jobs, income, and tax revenues for local communities.  They have also helped drive down the cost of wind and solar power by more than two-thirds since 2009, making renewable energy more affordable for consumers. Read more >

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Xcel’s Plan to Cut Carbon 60 percent is Affordable and Will Benefit Minnesota’s Economy

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

Growing up in Minnesota, I have very fond memories of going fishing with my Dad in the land of 10,000 lakes.  Whether it was slaying crappies on Lake Minnetonka or catching walleyes on our summer trips to Bemidji, I’ll never forget the times we had enjoying Minnesota’s great outdoors. Read more >

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