clean fuels


Photos left to right: Washington Department of Commerce, iStockphoto/m-imagephotography

Will Washington Step Up on Climate in 2019?

, Western states policy manager

While the majority of Washingtonians are worried about climate change and support taking steps to reduce heat-trapping emissions,  it’s no secret that the state has struggled to adopt many big-ticket policies on this issue. (Voters rejected initiatives in 2016 and 2018 to place fees on the state’s biggest emitters of global warming emissions; the Legislature has failed to pass previous proposals from Gov. Inslee to put a price on emissions, and a court also struck down an Inslee administration regulation tackling emissions.) However, I’m not one to linger on past failure, and fortunately this year has brought new opportunities that give me hope Washington lawmakers will seize the moment and take much-needed steps to curtail the state’s global warming emissions.

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Photos left to right: Washington Department of Commerce, iStockphoto/m-imagephotography
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San Ardo Oil Field, Monterey County, CA. Photo: Loco Steve CC-BY-SA 2.0 (Flickr).

California’s Cap-and-Trade Program and Low Carbon Fuel Standard Go Together Like Peanut Butter and Jelly

, Western states policy manager

Policymakers are considering how California should cut global warming emissions by 40% between 2020 and 2030, and whether to extend the state’s cap-and-trade program beyond 2020. The oil industry supports the cap-and-trade program but wants to roll back California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard. They argue the two policies just don’t mix—like oil and water, you might say. However, I see the two policies more like peanut butter and jelly—they are good on their own but so much better together. Read more >

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WSPA Lies: Oil Companies Are At It Again… And California Is The Target

, director, California & Western States

This month my mail has included a handful of very sad and frustrating reminders of what a heavy hit truth and integrity can take when oil profits come into play, and I’m not alone. Read more >

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How Oregon Can Fill Up On Clean Fuels

, Senior policy and legal analyst

Something big is brewing in Oregon. No, it’s not a new IPA from Portland-based Bridgeport Brewery—though that sounds delightful. It’s the next phase of Oregon’s Clean Fuel Program, a forward-thinking regulation that requires transportation fuel to get steadily cleaner on average, ultimately achieving a 10 percent reduction in carbon emissions per unit of fuel in 10 years. Extending this rule is a big deal because approximately one-third of Oregon’s greenhouse gases come from transportation, and Oregon has the in-state resource potential to produce significant amounts of clean fuels. Read more >

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