climate change impacts


The 2019 Lancet Countdown US Policy Brief on health and climate change impressively connects the puzzle pieces between climate change and profound threats to people in the US, highlighting the urgent need to act to limit these threats.

2019 Lancet Countdown US Policy Brief Pieces Together Climate Change’s Public Health Effects

, Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist

The U.S. Policy Brief, which launches today, discusses the ways in which vulnerable and marginalized populations are negatively and disproportionately impacted by climate change. It also found that US energy-related carbon emissions rose in 2018, the largest increase in 8 years. Read more >

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US Military on the Front Lines of Extreme Heat

, senior climate scientist

If I were to tell you that there were nearly 2,800 cases of heat-related illness among active-duty members of the US military last year, you might not be surprised. After all, we have troops deployed throughout the Middle East, where some of the world’s hottest places are found. But what if I were to tell you that of those thousands of cases, only 67 occurred among troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan? It turns out that right here at home in the US, thousands of servicepeople suffer from heat-related illnesses like heat exhaustion and heat stroke every year, and the problem is set to grow much worse.

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Marine Corps Air Station Yuma
NBC News and InsideClimateNews
Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch
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How Alaska’s Recent Heat Wave May Worsen Climate Warming

, Kendall Science Fellow

Over the holiday weekend, three cities in Alaska experienced record heat with temperatures in Anchorage reaching 90°F. In a city where local July temperatures averaged 61°F in 2018, this extreme heat illustrates the dramatic effects of climate change in northern regions of the world. These record-breaking temperatures, however, could further intensify climate warming by priming Alaskan landscapes to release carbon and heat-trapping gases in two major ways. Read more >

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Photo: BLM Oregon

Scientists Advocating for Climate Action in Oregon: Why we are stepping up and speaking out

Sharon C Delcambre, PhD, Visiting Instructor of Environmental Studies, University of Portland; Frank D. Granshaw, PhD, adjunct faculty in Geology and University Studies, Portland State University, , UCS

We are two climate scientists, currently teaching about climate change at two universities in Portland, Oregon. We are also two concerned scientists who understand the severe threats that climate change is posing to human well-being, as well as two concerned parents (and one concerned grandfather) who are worried about the future of climate extremes that our children and grandchildren must bear. As members of the UCS Science Network, this year we have used our voices as scientists and experts to speak with Oregon state legislators and advocate for strong climate action in Oregon. Here are our stories.

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Photo: BLM Oregon
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Water in an Uncertain Future: Planning the New Normal

, director, California & Western States

Northern California breathed a sigh of relief this weekend as rain and cooler temperatures finally arrived in force after the devastating fires in October. Now the question is, what kind of a winter will we have, and in particular, how much snow and rain will we or will we not get?

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