climate liability


Shareholders Not Playing Games at Big Oil Annual General Meetings

, climate accountability campaign manager

Major fossil fuel producers are holding their annual general meetings (AGMs) this month amid mounting pressure from investors, increasing risks of legal liability for climate damages, and heightened scrutiny of their lobbying and public policy advocacy. BP and Royal Dutch Shell host their AGMs this week; ExxonMobil and Chevron will follow next week.

If shareholder meetings were classic game shows, and investors were keeping score, fossil fuel companies would be coming up short. Read more >

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ExxonMobil refinery in Baton Rouge, LA.

2°C or not 2°C? Unanswered Questions in ExxonMobil’s and Chevron’s Climate Risk Reports

, climate accountability campaign manager

Heading into their annual meetings at the end of this month, both ExxonMobil and Chevron have published reports in response to investor demands that they disclose their plans for a world in which global temperature increase is kept well below two degrees Celsius (2°C) above pre-industrial levels—the target set in the Paris Climate Agreement. Should ExxonMobil and Chevron shareholders be satisfied with these reports? No—and there are indications that some are not. I took a look at these reports, consulted with other UCS experts, and identified four big questions left unanswered. Read more >

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Shell sign in gas station
Photo: David Nagy CC-BY-SA-2.0 (Flickr)

Shell Knew About Climate Risks Since the 1980s, Will it Act Now?

, climate accountability campaign manager

The year is 1988. The Wonder Years debuts on TV, George Michael’s “Faith” tops the Billboard charts, gas costs $1.67 at the pump, the U.S. Surgeon General states that the addictive properties of nicotine are similar to those of heroin and cocaine, and Royal Dutch Shell writes a confidential report on climate science and its own role in global warming. This report is one of dozens of internal documents unearthed by journalist Jelmer Mommers of De Correspondent and posted this week on Climate Files that shed more light on what Shell knew decades ago about the risks of burning fossil fuels. Read more >

David Nagy
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It’s The Largest Methane Leak in U.S. History. Who’s Responsible?

, senior fuels engineer

Perhaps the only thing growing as fast as the Powerball Jackpot this week is the liability that Southern California Gas Company faces for its massive natural gas leak discovered last October. The leak’s three month anniversary, on January 23rd, is expected to pass without any resolution, and current estimates are that it will not be stopped until at least March 2016. We know the leak has very negative implications for the climate—so what is happening to hold the company accountable for its impacts? Read more >

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