coastal climate impacts


Hawaii Sea Grant

In a Snapshot, “Sea” the Future Today

Cuong Tran and Diana Lopera, , UCS

They say that a picture can speak a thousand words … but what if the picture could paint a future 10, 50, 100 years from now? And not just a future that’ll impact one person, but rather the future that will impact many. Through the eyes of concerned community members and the power of community science, we find that things may be closer than they appear. Read more >

Hawaii Sea Grant
Bookmark and Share

New Interactive Map Highlights Effects of Sea Level Rise, Shows Areas of Chronic Flooding by Community

, senior climate scientist

A new interactive map tool lets you explore when and where chronic flooding–defined as 26 floods per year or more–will force communities to make hard choices. Here’s how to use it. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Chevron, Exxon, Phillips 66 React to UCS’ Stormy Seas, Rising Risks Report

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Last month, my colleague Christina Carlson and I released our report, Stormy Seas, Rising Risks: What Investors Should Know About Climate Change Impacts at Oil Refineries. The report analyzed the risk that five companies—Chevron, Exxon Mobil, Marathon Petroleum, Phillips 66, and Valero—face from sea level rise and storm surge, and compared that to what risk companies did and did not disclose to their investors. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Three Reasons Why the Virginia Coastal Protection Act Is Smart Policy

, Senior energy analyst

A Washington Post editorial yesterday called out a new bill in the Virginia state legislature as “the smart way” to go about cutting carbon emissions. Here are three reasons why it’s easy to agree with that take on what my home state might do. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Talking About Sea Level Rise: Leading Scientists Meet in Galveston, Texas

, climate scientist

What better place to talk about the impacts of sea level rise than a coastal city on a barrier island on the Gulf Coast? That’s where I was two weeks ago – in Galveston, Texas, with 80 other Earth scientists at a conference sponsored by the Geological Society of America and the American Geophysical Union. Galveston was the site of the worst natural disaster in U.S. history, more than a century ago. Read more >

Bookmark and Share