Colorado


Subaru vehicles are popular in Colorado and environmentalism is part of their brand identity, so it's troubling that their sole electric vehicle isn't available in Colorado. Photo: Tim Hurst/Flickr

Why Colorado Needs a Zero Emission Vehicles Standard

, Senior vehicles engineer

Colorado is poised to enact requirements for automakers to sell “Zero Emission Vehicles” (ZEVs) in the state. In 2018, Colorado was already in the top 5 states in terms of percent of vehicle sales that are electric in the country, so why is this important? It’s because despite progress, Colorado could be moving even faster to switch from gasoline to electricity to power cars and trucks, if there were more models of electric vehicles available.

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Photo: Tim Hurst/Flickr
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Photo: Xcel Energy Center

Xcel Commits to 100% Carbon Free Energy. Why is this a big deal? How will they do it?

, Senior Energy Analyst

A 100-plus-year-old company became the first major US utility to target 100% carbon-free electricity by 2050. The company, Xcel Energy, serves millions of customers across eight states. The company’s announcement builds on previous goals to reduce carbon emissions. But setting an ambitious goal is one thing; implementing it can be tricky.

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Photo: Xcel Energy Center
Xcel
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Fracking in Colorado: Did the Oil and Gas Taskforce Finish Its Tasks?

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

When Colorado officials announced that they would set up a blue-ribbon taskforce charged with making informed recommendations on oil and gas development in the state, there were high hopes. In fact, I commended the state for establishing a strong procedure and promising mechanism for informed decision-making for fracking in Colorado. What an opportunity, I thought, for a science-informed decision in an otherwise science-lacking debate. Now that the commission has issued recommendations, it’s worth revisiting what happened. Did the taskforce succeed? Let’s walk through its moves. Read more >

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5 Reasons Why Colorado Should Increase—Not Roll Back—Its Renewable Energy Standard

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

UPDATE: (March 3, 11 a.m.): Good news! Yesterday, the Colorado House of Representative’s State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee voted against the proposed rollback of the state’s renewable energy standard, effectively killing SB 44 for the 2015 legislative session. This is yet another defeat for fossil fuel interests who do not want to compete with renewables on a more level playing field.

On February 5th, state Senate Republicans passed a bill to roll back Colorado’s renewable energy standard (RES), which has helped make the state a national leader in clean energy. Rolling back the RES is precisely the wrong direction for Colorado to go at this time. In addition to providing important benefits to Colorado’s economy, increasing renewable energy use is one of the most cost-effective strategies for complying with the EPA’s proposed power plant carbon standards. Read more >

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The Colorado Oil and Gas Task Force: Still a Chance for Science to Inform Fracking Policy

, , Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

When news broke last month that the state of Colorado would be creating a blue-ribbon task force to study the impacts and inform regulation of hydraulic fracturing in the state, I wrote about the opportunity for science. In a state that has been ground zero in the fracking debate in many ways, this is a chance, I wrote, for Colorado to take a step back and consider how science can better inform oil and gas development there. Unfortunately, yesterday’s announcement of the task force membership shows this has yet to be the case. Read more >

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