Democracy


Equality, More or Less: How the Supreme Court Might Fix Gerrymandering

, Kendall Science Fellow

This week the Supreme Court prepared to make voting rights history ahead of the 2020 Census redistricting cycle. Justices heard oral arguments in two partisan gerrymandering cases: a Republican gerrymander in North Carolina (Rucho v Common Cause) and a Democratic gerrymander in Maryland (Lamone v Benesik). Plaintiffs in these cases are seeking relief and a standard to rein in state legislative attempts to maximize partisan advantage through the manipulation of district boundaries.

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Photo: Omari Spears/UCS

6 Ways H.R.1 Would Strengthen Democracy and Science-Based Policy

, Kendall Science Fellow

The U.S. House of Representatives will soon advance the most significant electoral integrity bill since the 1965 Voting Rights Act for a floor vote. H.R.1, the For the People Act, is comprehensive legislation that would help modernize outdated election practices and curb the corrupting influence of money in politics. If you care about good governance and transparent policymaking, or are concerned about science being sidelined while entrenched interests shape policy to their benefit, you should check out H.R.1.

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Photo: Omari Spears/UCS
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Source: Michael Fleshman/CC BY-SA 2.0 (Flickr)

Congress Can Finally Secure Our Right to an Equally Weighted Vote: Here’s How

, Kendall Science Fellow

When the 116th Congress convenes in January, the new Democratic House majority has promised to make electoral integrity literally its first priority: House Resolution 1. Read more >

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Photo: Quinn Dombrowski/Flickr

Scientific Integrity and Privacy at Risk in Census

, Kendall Science Fellow

When the Framers of the U.S. Constitution determined that political power should be allocated proportionally based on population and race (as opposed to wealth, heredity, or religion), they needed a scientific means of measuring population. That is the primary reason that we have the Decennial Census, so that population traits can be identified geographically. Since then, the Census has become the largest scientific endeavor that the nation undertakes on a regular basis. In recent days, however, testimony in several court cases challenging the current Administration’s attempt to politicize the Census has revealed an alarming threat to its scientific integrity, and by extension, countless political and economic functions that rely on the Census.

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Photo: Quinn Dombrowski/Flickr
Source: https://americanmigrations.uic.edu/censustools.htm
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Your Guide to Tuesday’s Transformation of Democracy

, Kendall Science Fellow

Democracy in America will be transformed Tuesday night, for better or worse. Or both. In the worst-case scenario, numerous voting rights and electoral reforms will go down in flames across the country, new barriers to voting will be erected, and despite winning millions of more votes, the more popular political party will fall short of winning governing control over the House of Representatives, designed to represent “the People alone,” as James Madison put it. Popular Sovereignty is but a quaint memory, the pillars of democracy crumble, and we submit to our oligarchic overlords. Read more >

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