diversity in STEM


Houston Stop Asian Hate Vigil and Rally
Melody Tan

The Science Policy Community’s Responsibility to Address Anti-Asian Xenophobia

Christopher Tonnu Jackson, Ph.D. candidate in Chemistry at University of California, Berkeley, and Melody Tan, Ph.D. candidate in Bioengineering, Rice University, , UCS

As early-career Asian American scientists pursuing science policy professions, we have witnessed the weaponization of scientific research against people who share our heritage as our communities in the United States face the consequences of this rhetoric. 

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Melody Tan
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Paige Greenwood

I Chose Protesting for Black Lives Matter Over Writing My PhD Dissertation 

Paige Greenwood, Neuroscience Doctoral Candidate, , UCS

These past few weeks, I’ve had to make a choice between writing my doctoral dissertation and protesting for the safety and protection of Black Lives. I chose the latter. Read more >

Paige Greenwood
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Photo: Another Believer/Wikimedia Commons

Trump Administration Wrongfully Brands Chinese Scientists as Spies, Hindering Scientific Progress

, Research Analyst

I once thought that international scientific collaboration – of talking to your colleagues from around the world and sharing scientific information that could lead to real breakthroughs in the field – was a topic that was so non-controversial, it was a given. It just makes sense. Getting the best minds together in a room to solve the world’s toughest problems is one of the best ways for science to progress. How could anyone disagree with this?

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Photo: Another Believer/Wikimedia Commons
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Photo by Yomex Owo/Unsplash.

How to Make Professional Conferences More Accessible for Disabled People: Guidance from Actual Disabled Scientists

Gabi Serrato Marks, Ph.D. candidate, , UCS

Attending professional conferences is a key part of life as a scientist. It’s where we present our research, network, and reconnect with colleagues. But for disabled scientists like me, conferences can be inaccessible and frustrating. I talked to several other scientists with a wide range of disabilities about how conferences could be better, and put their advice together in this short summary (also available in a video, if you prefer that). Read more >

Photo by Yomex Owo/Unsplash.
Photo by Matthias Wagner/Unsplash
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Women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory pose for a photo in mission control in honor of Women in Science Day. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Fighting for a Diverse and Equitable STEM Workforce in Colorado

Marian Hamilton, , UCS

In the state of Colorado, there are just over two million women, making up 53% of the enrolled undergraduate population and 50% of the workforce. However, women account for only 33% of those graduating with degrees in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) and hold only 26% of STEM jobs in the state. Colorado is not unique – this disparity in STEM education and employment is a nation-wide trend. This disparity begins early, with difference in male and female student interest in STEM showing up as early as middle school, by some estimates, and female students being more likely to self-describe themselves as “bad at math” as early as second grade. These differences in encouragement and interest have broad-reaching, profound, and lifelong implications for women’s economic security, career advancement, and workforce readiness compared to their male counterparts. Read more >

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