DOI


Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina. Photo: NPS

If You Can’t Censor It, Bury It: DOI Tries to Make a Stark New Study on Rising Seas Invisible

, deputy director, Climate & Energy Program

A new National Park Service (NPS) report is unequivocal that human-caused climate change has significantly increased the rate of sea level rise that is putting coastal sites at risk. But the study is difficult to find on the web and the report’s lead author, Maria Caffrey of the University of Colorado, says she had to fight to keep many scientific statements about climate change in the final version. Read more >

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Photo: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Donald Trump’s State of the Union: Actions Speak Louder Than Words

, director of strategy & policy

In his State of the Union address to Congress, President Trump exaggerated the benefits of the Republican tax cut bill to average Americans, overlooked the harm that will result from his push to weaken public health and worker safety protections, and disregarded the serious concerns expressed about key elements of his forthcoming infrastructure proposal. Read more >

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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke refused to meet with National Park System Advisory Board members last year, prompting most of them to quit. Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

From National Parks to the EPA, Trump Administration Stiff-Arms Science Advisers

, senior writer

The Trump administration’s testy relationship with science reminds me of that old saying: Advice is least heeded when most needed. Read more >

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Photo: sharply_done/iStockphoto

New Report Reveals Trump Administration Is Abandoning Science Advice

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Experts serving as members of federal advisory committees are being frozen out of the very avenues that were designed to encourage external input on scientific issues to the federal government. Read more >

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Interior Department Updates Scientific Integrity Policy and Creates Handbook

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

The Department of the Interior came out late yesterday with the 3.0 version of its scientific integrity policy, along with a new handbook that describes how the policy will be implemented. The new materials are simplified, streamlined, and more clear, bringing the department once again to the front of the pack in the Obama administration’s quest to create strong scientific integrity standards within federal agencies and departments. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell is expected to speak about the new policy in a keynote address today before the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

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