energy efficiency


Struan Fraser/Flickr

Better Ways of Valuing Energy Efficiency in Minnesota and Beyond

, lead Midwest energy analyst

Today, the Union of Concerned Scientists released a new report on ways to better value the benefits of energy efficiency. Our report, Energy and Emissions Benefits from Minnesota Energy Efficiency Investments, focuses on improving the analytical approach to how Minnesota utilities value energy efficiency but is broadly applicable to other states as well.

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Struan Fraser/Flickr
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Clean Energy Job Losses: 600,000, and Counting, from COVID Impacts

, Senior energy analyst

The latest analysis of clean energy job losses in the US shows that the news is even worse than expected. As of the end of April, the toll stood at almost 600,000 US clean energy workers out of work, and the number seemed certain to climb.

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BW Research Partnership, May 2020
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Why Congress Must Invest in Environmental Justice and Equity in the Next Recovery Package

, Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist

People of color. The elderly. Women and LGBTQ people. Low income families. These are some of the most vulnerable among us. As such, they must be the focus of Congressional attention.

A recent report by nonprofit Kresge Health has drawn a straight line from these most vulnerable people to the likelihood of living near hazardous waste facilities. They are more likely to lack economic stability, education, housing and transportation options and even safe drinking water. Congress has it in its hands to change this as it crafts its next recovery package. Read more >

Derrick Jackson
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AWEA

500,000 US Clean Energy Jobs at Risk from COVID Effects

, Senior energy analyst

Workers in the clean energy sector, like the rest of the economy, are taking a serious hit from COVID-19. Two new analyses offer important new data for understanding the scale and breadth of COVID’s impacts on clean energy jobs. One tallies up the initial hit to clean energy workers, and looks at what more pain might be coming. The other looks at where clean energy’s powerful job creation ability had gotten the sector before COVID hit. Here’s what the numbers say about what’s at risk, and why it matters. Read more >

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Fed, States Should Protect Clean Energy Jobs for Black and Latino Workers

, Western States Energy Manager and Senior Analyst

At least 316 million people in the United States (or 96% of the country) have been directed to stay home to halt the spread of COVID-19. Those who are not essential workers are likely using up more electricity at home than they normally would, so you might imagine that the energy sector could be one of the few industries to come out of this pandemic relatively unscathed.

That may be true for regulated electric utilities and the large scale projects that contract with them. But it hasn’t held true for the energy sector’s largest employer, the energy efficiency sector, which has seen major layoffs since the start of the pandemic. And the pandemic’s impacts could be even more severe for smaller programs diversifying the energy efficiency workforce through job training programs for youth, low-income communities, and people of color.

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Department of Energy/Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL
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