energy storage


Bringing Energy Storage to Energy Markets

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Excitement over storing electricity, and expectations for new market rules in the US, promise great changes in energy. Instead of hype and speculation, this blog offers a preview of those market changes. Read more >

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Energy storage experts from across the country meet with UCS staff to discuss the role of the federal government in supporting energy storage. Photo: UCS

Energy Storage Should Be an Urgent National Priority

, director of gov't affairs, Climate & Energy

Imagine if the US had these three things: access to unlimited electricity from clean sources everywhere in the country, an electricity grid impervious to outages and electricity prices that were even cheaper than they are today.  These aspirations can become reality with advancements in energy storage.

This technology was developed right here in the good ole’ US of A, but unfortunately, the US is now falling behind other countries in this increasingly lucrative global market, and our outdated electric grid is growing more vulnerable to increasing threats like cyber-attacks and extreme weather.  So how do we regain our leadership in this critical technology, and how can we increase the development and deployment of energy storage here at home?  The answer is innovation.

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Photo: UCS
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Getting More Wind and Solar is 100% Possible, But Not 100% Straightforward. Here’s Why

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

It’s not an issue of technology. Read more >

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A darkened Manhattan after Hurricane Sandy. Photo courtesy of David Shankbone.

Energy Storage is the Policy Epicenter of Energy Innovation

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Battery advances—some from government-funded R&D for vehicles, some from laptops and cellphones—have opened a door. Read more >

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Renewable energy in Illinois
Photo: tlindenbaum/Flickr

When Renewable Energy Costs Fall Quickly, How Should Buyers Get Good Information?

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Now that new wind and solar power plants are cheaper than burning fossil fuel at existing plants, old assumptions and outdated information are hazardous to our health and economy.

Recent news of renewable energy and storage competing to supply electricity is moving so fast, attention now must shift to how energy buyers make comparisons between fossil fuel and up-to-date information about renewable energy.  For years, UCS has pushed slow-moving institutions to keep up with the declining costs and improving performance of renewable energy. Read more >

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