environmental justice


Photo: FEMA

Climate Changes Health: The Backstory is the Front Story

Natalie Sampson, , UCS

12 years. That’s how long scientists say we have to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially to heed off the global catastrophic effects of climate change.  As such, climate change is arguably the greatest public health threat of our times as it already contributes to increased trauma, morbidity, and mortality from extreme weather events and displacement. Read more >

Photo: FEMO
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Electoral Reform Update: One State at a Time

, Kendall Science Fellow

Across the country this November, voters have an opportunity to improve the quality of U.S. elections in their states, and for the country as a whole. Read more >

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Environmental Justice Requires Electoral Reform: New Analysis

, Kendall Science Fellow

The Center for Science and Democracy has released a new analysis, Building a Healthier Democracy: The Link Between Voting Rights and Environmental Justice, which demonstrates the negative impact of restrictive election laws on voter turnout across Congressional districts (see the report and our impact maps here). Read more >

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Art by Micah Bazant

Weathering the Storm: Building Community Resilience in Environmental Justice Communities

Amee Raval, , UCS

In 2015, It Takes Roots convened a delegation of climate justice leaders to participate in mobilizations at the COP21 in Paris and proclaimed “It Takes Roots to Weather the Storm.” When I first heard this statement, I was struck by the vivid imagery it evoked. I envisioned a tree with roots that, despite a powerful rainstorm, swirled, connected, and clenched with fortitude into the depths of its rich soil. I imagined branches growing and the emergence of leaves bearing fresh fruit. Read more >

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Between Two Terns: A Conversation on Endangered Species and Social Justice

, researcher, Center for Science & Democracy

Endangered Species Day was introduced as a resolution by Congress in 2006 to encourage “the people of the United States to become educated about, and aware of, threats to species, success stories in species recovery, and the opportunity to promote species conservation worldwide.” This year, Endangered Species Day (May 18) began with a devastating school shooting. It really had me questioning how appropriate it would be to emphasize the importance of wildlife conservation while so many in the world and our nation seem to place little value on human lives. Read more >

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