equity


10 Things That the Scholarly Community Can Do to Stand in Solidarity

Acknowledge the history. Revise your work. Refuse to be complicit. Read more >

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Numbers that Take Your Breath Away: COVID-19, Air Pollution, and Equity

, Senior vehicles engineer

Human beings have been challenged by microorganisms for centuries:  the bubonic plague, smallpox, measles, influenza, Marburg, rabies, HIV, Ebola, dengue, SARS, the Middle East respiratory syndrome, and many others. However, we can limit the severity of future outbreaks of deadly diseases, and we can reduce and eventually eliminate the disproportionate impact of these diseases on people of color, by building a robust health system for all, enforcing air pollution regulations, and supporting science and scientists. Read more >

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Derrick Jackson

Fighting for a Just COVID-19 Response

As much as hurricanes Katrina and Maria upended African American and Latinx families, the landfall of the coronavirus brings a gale of another order. This Category 5 of infectious disease packs the power to level communities already battered from environmental, economic, and health injustice. If response and relief efforts fail to adequately factor in existing disparities, the current pandemic threatens a knockout punch to the American Dream.

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Derrick Jackson
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Beginning a Courageous Journey: Connecting Science & Justice

Dr. Brian R. Shmaefsky, , UCS

One year after the Flint Water Crisis I was invited to participate in a water rights session at a conference hosted by the US Human Rights Network in Austin, Texas in 2015. The reason I was at the conference was to promote efforts by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to encourage scientists to shine a light on how science intersects with human rights, in the United States as well as in the context of international development. My plan was to sit at an information booth and share my stories about water quality projects I spearheaded in communities in Bangladesh, Colombia, and the Philippines. I did not expect to be thrown into conversations that made me reexamine how scientists use their knowledge as a public good. Read more >

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Tony Webster/Flickr

The EPA’s New Shameful Tactic: Avoid People Poisoned by Coal Ash

, Research Analyst

Imagine you live next to a coal-fired power plant. Near the power plant, you may have seen heavy machinery dumping loads of greyish substance into an open pit or a pond. You learn that the greyish stuff is called coal ash, a substance that’s chockful of toxic heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, and selenium – all of which are cancer-causing agents – and that 140 million tons of coal ash is produced in the US every year. You may notice that serious health issues are arising in your community, so you can’t help but wonder: is there a connection between your community’s health problems and the dumping of this coal ash? Is this stuff getting into your drinking water?

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Tony Webster/Flickr
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