fisheries


Jabbi/Wikimedia CC BY-SA 2.0

El trabajo más difícil dentro del sector de la pesca no es pescar sino procesar el pescado durante una pandemia global

Amanda Moeser, , UCS

Las vacaciones en casa no existen para las personas que trabajan sin cesar para pescar, cultivar, procesar, empacar, transportar y distribuir los mariscos en Estados Unidos. Denominada inmediatamente como un servicio esencial, la industria pesquera cuenta con ingresos anuales de $244 mil millones, aporta 1,74 millones de puestos de trabajo y es el alma  de los pueblos costeros a lo largo de EEUU, desde los puertos pintorescos de Nueva Inglaterra hasta las comunidades del Golfo y los puertos bulliciosos del Nordeste Pacífico y Alaska. Read more >

Jabbi/Wikimedia
Bookmark and Share

The Most Dangerous Job in Fishing Isn’t Fishing—It’s Processing Fish During a Global Pandemic

Amanda Moeser, Ph.D. Environmental Science student, , UCS

There is no such thing as a “staycation” for the people working tirelessly to fish, farm, process, package, transport, and distribute seafood in the United States. Immediately deemed an “essential service,” the $244 billion/year seafood industry supports 1.74 million jobs and is the heart and soul of seaside towns across the United States. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Billy Metcalf Photography/Flickr

Reviving the Gulf Dead Zone Is Worth it: Our New Report Shows the Benefits of Action  

, Economist

Earlier this month, NOAA forecast that this summer in the Gulf of Mexico an area the size of Delaware and Connecticut combined would have so little oxygen that marine life flees from it or dies in it. In 2017, this “dead zone” was the size of New Jersey, the largest one ever recorded. Read more >

Billy Metcalf Photography/Flickr
Bookmark and Share

Aquaculture pens off the coast of Maine. Photo: NOAA National Ocean Service

Ocean Conservation Is Still Significantly at Risk Despite Backtrack on NOAA Mission Change

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

Last week, following press attention to a presentation by the Acting Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) on new directions for the agency, Adm. Tim Gallaudet quickly backtracked and stated that the mission would not fundamentally change. Read more >

Photo: NOAA National Ocean Service
Bookmark and Share

Photo: Darla White (NOAA)

Ocean Agency Must Keep Its Focus on Climate Change and Sustaining Marine Ecosystems

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

It has been a tumultuous couple of weeks for ocean aficionados like me. The Acting Administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Adm. Timothy Gallaudet, made a presentation to leadership at the Department of Commerce, NOAA’s home, on possible changes and priorities for the agency during this administration. His second slide clearly describes a shift away from scientific work on climate and efforts to conserve and manage ocean and coastal resources. Read more >

Bookmark and Share