flooding


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New UCS Analysis: Coronavirus and Flooding Set to Collide in US

, senior climate scientist

Juan Declet-Barreto codeveloped this analysis.

Last week, when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released its seasonal forecast for the spring flooding season, I was jolted into a reality that some people in the US are already experiencing: extreme weather stops for no virus.  Just days after NOAA’s forecast came out, the flooding arrived:  floodwaters  from heavy rains in central and southern Ohio required the evacuation of dozens of people, leading one local sheriff to state “God knows how we will figure it out with COVID-19.” Read more >

Russ Munn/AgStock Images
NOAA
Pei and Shaman, 2020. Map by Juan Declet-Barreto
Pei and Shaman, 2020
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USDA Photo by Lance Cheung/Flickr

Farm State Voters See Soil as a Solution to Agriculture’s Woes

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

The Trump administration’s still-fuzzy trade deal with China, announced (as usual) via tweet last Friday, has landed in farm country with a thud. Having endured financial losses and trade uncertainty for nearly two years, farmers have reacted with skepticism and even anger. Read more >

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Mounting Impacts on Florida Will Make It Hard for Trump to Avoid Climate Change Talk at G7

, senior climate scientist

The White House announced yesterday that “climate change will not be on the agenda” for the G7  summit. The president also announced the June 2020 event would be held at Trump National Doral Miami, the luxury hotel and golf resort he owns about 15 miles northwest of the city. Trump may want to avoid discussing climate change at next year’s G7 summit, but mounting impacts on Florida will make that difficult.

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Andreas Sandberg
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As Presidential Candidates Prepare for Ohio Debate, Farmers Need a New Vision

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

It has been a very bad year for Ohio’s farmers. Across the state, they were unable to plant crops on nearly 1.5 million acres this past spring due to unrelenting rainfall and flooding. The Buckeye State has also been hard-hit by the Trump administration’s trade war, with the price of soybeans—Ohio’s most financially valuable agricultural commodity—plummeting. At the same time, intensive commodity farming has taken a heavy toll on the state’s water resources. And growing just one or two crops, as many Ohio farmers do, leaves them and our food supply vulnerable in an erratic climate future. But changing the way farmers do business—starting with their soil—can help solve all these problems. And when the fourth Democratic presidential debate kicks off in Westerville, Ohio on Tuesday, it sure would be great to hear about the candidates’ plans to make healthy soil a reality. Read more >

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Clouds associated with a tropical disturbance bubbled up over the Gulf Coast on Wednesday, July 10, 2019. Credit: NOAA

How Climate Risks Get Compounded: Louisiana Grapples With Heavy Rain, Tropical Storm Barry, and Swollen Mississippi

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

Heavy recent rains, along with the looming threats from tropical storm Barry, are putting New Orleans and other Louisiana communities at risk of major, life-threatening flooding.

Images from earlier this week show city streets turned into rivers as close to 9 inches of rain fell in three hours. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) is predicting that tropical storm Barry could come ashore on Saturday as a Category 1 hurricane. Meanwhile, the Mississippi is flowing very high due to heavy rains in the Midwest and South Central US earlier this year. Additional rain and storm surge from Barry mean that flooding is forecast to be extensive, and warnings have been raised that some levees in Louisiana could be overtopped or come close to that.

This chain of compound climate-related risks highlights the kinds of unprecedented threats climate change is forcing on people. Read more >

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