geoengineering


Photo: NASA

The Way We Talk About Geoengineering Matters

, Solar Geoengineering Research, Governance and Public Engagement Fellow

Solar geoengineering describes a set of approaches that would reflect sunlight to cool the planet. The most prevalent of these approaches entails mimicking volcanic eruptions by releasing aerosols (tiny particles) into the upper atmosphere to reduce global temperatures – a method that comes with immense uncertainty and risk. We don’t yet know how it will affect regional weather patterns, and in turn its geopolitical consequences. One way we can attempt to understand potential outcomes are through models.

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Photo: NASA
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Credit: NASA/GSFC

Confronting Solar Geoengineering: What You Need to Know

, Solar Geoengineering Research, Governance and Public Engagement Fellow

Climate change threatens public health, food security, water availability, and national security – just to name a few areas of impact. Dramatic reductions in emissions and increased investments in measures to adapt to unavoidable impacts are essential but may not be enough to limit severe climate risks—and to date, these actions have fallen far short of what is needed. Some researchers are proposing to do experiments to also test the potential feasibility and effectiveness of geoengineering approaches to help limit climate change, while recognizing that mitigation and adaptation must remain our first-line solutions.

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Credit: NASA/GSFC
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Groundbreaking New Report on Geoengineering Tackles Carbon Dioxide Removal Experiments

, senior climate scientist

The scientific body established by a law signed by President Lincoln released two groundbreaking reports today on geoengineering. Read more >

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Reflecting Sunlight to Cool Earth: The NAS Weighs Controversial Measures in New Report

, director of science & policy

The president’s science advisor John P. Holdren has often observed that humanity has three basic options for dealing with climate change: Mitigation (reducing heat-trapping emissions), adaptation (coping with unavoidable impacts of climate change), and suffering.  The more swiftly we both mitigate and adapt, the less suffering we endure and impose on future generations.

Suppose, however, that we falter and temperatures continue to rise to dangerous levels. In a climate emergency, facing high risks of major and otherwise unavoidable impacts, should the U.S. or other governments consider forced cooling of Earth by injecting reflecting aerosol particles into the stratosphere? Read more >

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