Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act


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Trump USDA Commemorates National School Breakfast Week by Declaring Potatoes a Fruit

, Food Systems & Health Analyst

It’s National School Breakfast Week, and the Trump administration is celebrating by rolling back science-based nutrition standards that are keeping kids healthy at school. Read more >

Omari Spears/UCS
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The Best School Lunch News You Never Heard

, Food Systems & Health Analyst

This spring, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) released a groundbreaking new study showing that kids and schools alike have benefited enormously from new school nutrition standards adopted over the course of the last seven years. This is the first comprehensive assessment of how schools across the nation have fared since the standards were first rolled out in 2012-2013.

But if you missed the press release, it’s because there wasn’t one. Read more >

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U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue holds up his chocolate milk drink at Discovery Elementary School, in Arlington, VA, on October 18, 2018. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung/Flickr

Sonny Perdue’s School Lunch Bait-and-Switch

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

Last week, the Trump administration finalized a rule that will weaken nutrition standards governing what kids are served in the school lunch line. This rollback had been in works for more than a year—Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue first signaled his intention in May 2017, just weeks into his new job. But now, one key component of the final rule is different from what he proposed back then. And you probably won’t be shocked to hear that it’s worse, not better, for children’s health. Read more >

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A bustling farmers market outside Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City, offering healthy food to patients and doctors alike. Photo: Amelia Moore

In the Rush to Repeal Obamacare, A Reminder: Food Policy Is Health Policy

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

2017 is nearly upon us. And while the year ahead seems full of uncertainty, some things never change, including the tendency of many Americans to make New Year’s resolutions to improve their diets and lose weight.

But the day-to-day “what to eat” decisions of individual Americans are fickle and heavily shaped by the food environment around us. Which is why, as the incoming president and Congress set out their policy priorities—including a long-planned repeal of Obamacare—it’s worth looking at potential policy changes that could make it harder for Americans to keep their resolutions in 2017 and beyond. Read more >

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The Big Three Threats to Progress on Added Sugar Transparency

, Lead science and policy analyst

The FDA’s revisions to the nutrition facts label, which we celebrated in May, could now be under siege on a few different fronts. Read more >

house.gov
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