inclusion


Breaking Through the Ice: LGBTQ+ Visibility in Stem

Dr. Lauren Esposito, , UCS

I grew up in one of the only Democrat-voting counties in Texas, along the border of Mexico. The majority of people who live in the city are Hispanic, and Catholic culture runs deep for those people who practice religion and those who don’t alike. My family wasn’t much for religion, but one summer my grandmother sent me to Vacation Bible School, as it’s called in Texas. I fit in perfectly because on the first day I declared to the rest of the kids that I was a boy. I guess I knew from the ripe old age of six that being a girl who was a tomboy wasn’t going to make me any friends in West Texas, and it was easier to fit in pretending to be something I wasn’t, which in this case was a boy. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Pride Month Offers Lessons of Inclusion—Science Should Listen

, research scientist, Center for Science and Democracy

This year’s pride month is coming to an end, and with it I take many valuable lessons learned. In many ways, pride 2017 was historic. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Five Ways to Move Beyond the March: A Guide for Scientists Seeking Strong, Inclusive Science

Alexandra E. Sutton Lawrence, Rae Wynn-Grant, Cynthia Malone, Eleanor Sterling, Martha Groom, and Mary Blair, , UCS

The March for Science took place April 22 in locations all over the world — an exciting time for scientist-advocates and a proud moment for the global scientific community. As we reflect on the March, we must also reflect on the fact that organization of the March on Science 2017 has been a microcosm of the structural, systemic challenges that scientists continue to face in addressing equity, access, and inclusion in the sciences. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

When I March for Science, I’ll March for Equity, Inclusion, and Access

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

We are on the verge of something big. Scientists as a group are politically engaged like never before. They are communicating with decisionmakers, ready to march, and ready to run for office. The March for Science—an event that formed organically by a few enthusiastic people on Reddit and snowballed from there—is slated to be the largest demonstration for science that this country has ever seen. I’ve personally been blown away by the unprecedented support for scientists in the streets. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

How to Support LGBT Scientists After Orlando

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

There are plenty of parallels between the Orlando killing and other mass shootings. But this one is different in one important way. The murderer chose his target because it was a sanctuary where LGBT people gathered. Read more >

Bookmark and Share