Inequitable Exposure to Air Pollution

Air pollution has significant impacts to public health and the cars, trucks, and buses on America’s roads contribute to this problem. While we are all exposed to this pollution, there are significant differences in the average exposure to this air pollution by different racial groups in the U.S. and exposure also varies greatly depending on where in the U.S. you live.


Alexander Popov/Unsplash

TCI Health Study Shows Benefits, But More Needed to Address Inequitable Air Pollution

, Senior vehicles engineer

Communities across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. could see substantial health improvements from just modest changes in air quality, according to a new preliminary study released by a team of researchers from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston University School of Public Health and the University of North Carolina. By investing in clean transportation solutions such as enhanced transit, safe and bikeable streets, and vehicle electrification, states in the region would not only experience lower greenhouse gas emissions, but also a drop in local air pollution. At a time when clean air is desperately needed, the health benefits of the proposed program are a step in the right direction, but we will need significant complementary policies to bring us into a truly equitable clean transportation future.
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The Violence of Pollution: The Injustice of Rolling Back Clean Air Protections

Paola Massoli, PhD, , UCS

It is mid-June 2020 and another day of unrest in America. As I scan the news, I learn that the environment has been under attack. Again. President Trump recently signed an executive order to dismantle the process requiring environmental reviews of large infrastructure projects, including oil and gas pipelines. I also learn that the administration is proposing restrictions that would further weaken air pollution controls. As I dig more, I find out that it could get a lot worse for clean water too. Read more >

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Exposure to Air Pollution from Vehicles in Illinois Is Inequitable — It Doesn’t Have to Be

, Senior vehicles engineer

Exposure to PM2.5 pollution from cars, trucks, and buses varies greatly within Illinois. Concentrations are highest in urban areas and downwind of those areas; Chicago and its immediate surroundings are affected the most. Cook County, including Chicago, not only has the state’s highest PM2.5 pollution exposure, but it also is one of the nation’s worst affected counties. Read more >

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La contaminación del aire causada por los vehículos en Illinois es injusta, y no tiene porqué serlo

, Senior vehicles engineer

Los autos, camiones y buses son fuentes significativas de contaminación del aire en Illinois.  Pero, ¿cuanta de esta contaminación es atribuible a estos vehículos?, y ¿quiénes están expuestos a ella?

Para ayudarme a responder esta pregunta, he usado un modelo computarizado para estimar la cantidad de partículas finas de materia que causan la contaminación del aire (conocida como PM2.5) que resulta del uso de vehículos en carretera (autos, camiones y buses.)  Read more >

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Who Breathes the Dirtiest Air from Vehicles in Minnesota?

, Senior vehicles engineer

Most people know that cars, trucks, and buses from our highways and city streets are a significant source of harmful air pollution. While this pollution impacts all communities in the state to some degree, Minnesotans who face the greatest exposure to transportation pollution are those who live near highways, along major freight corridors, and in urban areas.

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