just transition


American Jobs Plan Offers Welcome Focus on Rural Communities

, senior energy analyst

In the context of the shift to a clean energy economy, how does the American Jobs Plan help workers and communities dependent on the coal industry? Read more >

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Investing in a Worker-Centered Federal Response to Energy Transition

, senior energy analyst

As we collectively work toward a clean energy economy, many advocates have started to recognize the need to address the disproportionate impact that such a transition will have on the workers and communities that depend on the fossil fuel industries to earn their livelihoods and power their economies. But what can policymakers do about it? And what should advocates be asking for?

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Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

President-Elect Biden Must Prioritize Coal Communities—and Here’s How

, senior energy analyst

President-elect Biden and his team must ensure that coal communities are not left behind in the transition to a clean energy economy. Fortunately, they have a ready-made blueprint. Read more >

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How to Help Coal Communities Recover from the Pandemic

, senior energy analyst

Workers and communities that depend on coal for their economic livelihoods need deliberate, sustained, and comprehensive action to ensure that they recover from the economic devastation left behind by the pandemic. The COVID-19 crisis has touched all Americans in some form or another, but it has laid bare the reality that the most vulnerable among us—communities of color and working class folks—are hurting the most and dying more often. That is simply unacceptable. Read more >

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What Does “Fairness to Coal Workers” Mean in the Response to COVID-19?

, senior energy analyst

Pretty much everyone around the globe has been affected by COVID-19. We’ve all had our lives turned upside-down by the unprecedented response to the pandemic. As of this writing, about 316 million Americans are subject to “stay at home” orders. By the time this thing is over, we’re all likely to have known someone who died of the disease. And while New York City is currently the epicenter of the crisis, it’s clear that the virus is about to overwhelm large swaths of rural America. Read more >

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