military


Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class(SW) James Kimber, U.S. Navy

The US Military, Resilient Energy, and the Zombie Apocalypse

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

A recent analysis from my colleagues at the Union of Concerned Scientists showed US military bases aren’t just on the front lines of homeland defense. They’re also, in a lot of cases, on the front lines of climate impacts. Rising seas and storm surges don’t stop for checkpoints and can threaten the energy supplies that military missions depend on. To understand how the pieces all fit together for our armed forces, I checked in with Wilson Rickerson and Michael Wu, cofounders of Converge Strategies, LLC, a resilience and advanced energy consulting company, about the intersection between the US military, clean energy, and resilience. And about how the Zombie Apocalypse comes into play. Read more >

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Would Chemical Safety Measures Under Dourson Protect Military Families? Probably Not.

, researcher, Center for Science & Democracy

Update (December 14, 2017): Michael Dourson has withdrawn his nomination to head the EPA’s division of chemical safety. Read the statement from UCS President Ken Kimmell, Dourson’s Withdrawal a Victory for Science, Health.


Dr. Michael Dourson, a toxicologist with a history of providing consultation to the chemical industry, could become the head of the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dourson has consistently defended the use of several chemicals found to pose major adverse health effects, manipulating his research in favor of industry interests. This could spell trouble for public health and safety, particularly in low-income communities and communities where residents are predominately people of color—which often includes military bases. Read more >

Charise Johnson
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Military and Civilians Alike are Battling Sea Level Rise in Tidewater Virginia

, deputy director, Climate & Energy Program

You need only drive down Messick Road in the Virginia tidewater town of Poquoson to get a sense of how vulnerable this whole region is to flooding and rising sea levels.

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