New York


Photo: Zach Miles/Unsplash

Here’s Why New York Should Pass the CCPA

, policy analyst

New York State is on the verge of passing one of the nation’s most ambitious economy-wide climate laws.

The Community and Climate Protection Act, or CCPA, would not only require New York to achieve 100% clean electricity by 2040, but also pave the way for the complete transition of New York’s economy to clean energy. The CCPA is the result of years of work by grassroots activists and leaders within the New York Renews coalition, demonstrating that with persistence and determination, momentum on the ground has the potential to achieve big things in climate policy.

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Photo: Zach Miles/Unsplash
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Year in Review: How 8 States Made 2016 a Huge Year for Clean Energy

, Energy policy analyst

With the Clean Power Plan’s future up in the air, and concerns about how science might fare given the recent election results, some may think 2016 wasn’t a great year for clean energy.  However, lots of great state level policies were passed — some with bipartisan support—and there’s even some good news on the national front. Read more >

Photo: Mark Jurrens (Wikimedia)
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NY-MA Doubleheader on Clean Energy is a Game Changer

, president

The rivalry between New York and Massachusetts is famous: Yankees vs. Red Sox, Giants vs. Patriots, Wall Street vs. Harvard/MIT, glamour vs. provincial charm. Last week, New York and Massachusetts competed to be the Northeast clean energy leader. And in this case, they both won. Actually, we all did. Read more >

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As Sea Level Rises in Jamaica Bay, New York, Tidal Flooding Moves from Occasional to Chronic

, , climate scientist

What would it be like to live in a place that floods every full moon? We asked that question and others in our report, Encroaching Tides, which was released last week. Read more >

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How Much Did Sea Levels Rise Over the Past 50 Years? A Lot If You Live on the U.S. Gulf or East Coasts

, , senior climate scientist

Sea levels are rising so fast along the U.S. East and Gulf coasts that some places have seen a greater increase in the last 50 years than the global average over the past 130 years. Read more >

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