Offshore wind


Offshore Wind in the US: Scale, Jobs and Innovation

, energy analyst

When I visited Block Island’s offshore wind farm 2 years ago I knew I was seeing history in the making. This project, the first one in operation in the US, has 5 powerful wind turbines and an installed capacity of 30 megawatts (MW). I just attended the US Offshore Wind 2019 conference and my mind is blown with the progress this industry is experiencing. Let me share 3 exciting facts that I learned at the conference. Read more >

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Credit: Ad Meskens

Offshore Wind’s Next Steps: 6 to Watch For

, Senior energy analyst

Things certainly aren’t dull in the world of offshore wind these days. Between new legislation to kick-start offshore wind markets, new bids to meet states’ demand for projects, and new markets getting set to open up, momentum just keeps building. Here are six near-term things I’m watching for. Read more >

Photo: Ad Meskens
Dennis Schroeder/NREL
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Credit: J. Rogers/UCS

What’s Hot in Offshore Wind: 5 Dispatches from the Front Lines

, Senior energy analyst

Here’s the latest on offshore wind, in 5 quick bites: Projects, pull, protections, power, and people. For America’s newest renewable energy source, the pieces are coming together nicely.

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Photo: Kim Hansen/Wikimedia Commons
Photo: NOAA.gov
Photo: Ad Meskens
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Photo: J. Rogers

Offshore Wind: Four Ways You Can Help

, Senior energy analyst

I know what you’re thinking: “It’s great to see all the progress being made in offshore wind—technology, cost, policy. But, John, how can I be a part of the action?” Fortunately, there are lots of opportunities. Here are four. Read more >

Photo: John Rogers
Photo by Derrick Z. Jackson
Photo: Kim Hansen/Wikimedia Commons
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Photo: William Hope

Wind vs. Gas: Winter Wind Beats New Pipelines

, Senior energy analyst

With the cold weather upon us, and a lot of debate about how to supply our energy needs, we can take a look at the power of wind.  Wind is actually stronger in the wintertime when it gets colder. The advantages of using wind to reduce natural gas needs in cold weather are real, and especially relevant to the debate over whether or not it makes sense to invest more into gas pipelines.

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Photo: William Hope
photo by Mike Jacobs
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