OSTP


A New Day for Science: President Biden’s Big Plan for Scientific Integrity And What Comes Next

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Today, the Biden Administration releases a presidential memo on scientific integrity and evidence-based policymaking, setting the stage for the administration’s efforts to build back from the Trump administration’s unprecedented assault on science and strengthen protections for science and scientists across the government. This is big and it puts science on the agenda like never before. Here’s my take on today’s bold actions and what we should watch in the coming months and years. Read more >

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President Biden and Vice President Harris Really Will Listen to the Scientists!

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

Scientists will finally be in the room when key issues are discussed and decisions are made. Read more >

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In 2021, Let’s Set the Bar Higher for Our Government

, Senior Analyst

A new Union of Concerned Scientists report released today provides recommendations for the next administration on how to restore science in policymaking. One element of ensuring independent science informs decisions is blocking opportunities for political interference and undue influence.

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The Senate Will Accelerate Kelvin Droegemeier’s White House Science Advisor Nomination. That’s a Good Thing.

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Try not to breathe too easily, but the Senate is in fast drive mode to consider the nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the White House Office and Science and Technology Policy. And well it should. These days, this is one nomination we should all be excited about, as this Superman of science policy is sorely needed in the White House.

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Remembering Jack Gibbons, Science Policy Titan

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

The first time I spoke with Jack Gibbons a decade ago, I’m afraid that I didn’t have enough of an appreciation of what he had accomplished. I was fairly new to the Union of Concerned Scientists and was told he might have some ideas for protecting government scientists from political interference in their work. Throughout the course of that first conversation, his advice was quite sound, but the history of the use of science in policy making that he gave me, combined with the long list of names he gave me whom I should contact, suggested that he would be a great person to have in our corner. Read more >

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