The Paris Climate Agreement

The Union of Concerned Scientists weighs in with insights, analysis, and commentary on this landmark global agreement, including President Trump’s announced withdrawal of the US from the accord.

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Restoring U.S. Forests by Mid-Century

, scientific adviser, Climate and Energy

As both scientists (in many published papers) and political leaders (in the Paris Agreement) have now recognized, to stop global warming—to keep the global temperature from increasing indefinitely—we need to peak and then reduce emissions rapidly. We need to get our release of global warming pollution into the atmosphere, down to a level below the amount that carbon sequestration by the biosphere takes out of the atmosphere. This means that we have to work incredibly hard on two parallel tracks, simultaneously. On the one hand, cut pollution drastically. And on the other hand, regrow the biosphere. Read more >

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US Must Do More to Meet Paris Climate Change Commitments

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

New analysis details how much power sector policies are contributing to the US 2025 global warming emission reduction goals. The bottom line: they make a serious dent in emissions but much more is needed to deliver on the promise of Paris. Read more >

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Cautious Hope: Global CO2 Emissions Remain Flat in 2015 while Renewable Energy Surges

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

New data released today show that, for the second year in a row, global carbon dioxide emissions remained flat in 2015. Coming off the Paris Agreement, these trends are cause for hope that we are making progress toward addressing climate change. Read more >

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Why Climate Finance Matters to Real People

Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, , UCS

We humans are used to the climate of the places where we live, regardless of how extreme they may be. I witnessed this first-hand during my time in Churchill with Polar Bears International, just a few weeks before COP21. While we were there to track the bears, I found that locals were waiting just as impatiently for the water to freeze and snow to fall, so they could head out to their cabins and trap lines. For all who live in the Arctic, life begins in the winter. But this winter—as in so many winters, lately – the sea ice was late to come, and both bears and people remained trapped on land well into December. Read more >

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9 Signs from 2015 that the Clean Energy Transition is Accelerating

, director of state policy & analysis, Clean Energy

Efforts to curb power sector carbon emissions—our nation’s largest source of global warming pollution—gained a lot of momentum in 2015. Read more >

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