particulate matter


EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler Photo: USDA/Flickr

Uncharted Territory: The EPA’s Science Advisors Just Called Out Administrator Wheeler

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Yesterday the EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) published a letter to Administrator Andrew Wheeler and acknowledged the group has inadequate expertise to conduct an essential review of the health impacts of particulate matter and ozone. We are now in uncharted territory and the EPA is in a tough position. Here are some key highlights from the letter and their implications. Read more >

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Photo: Steven Buss/Flickr

Five Takeaways from the EPA Meeting on Particulate Pollution

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Yesterday, the EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) had a teleconference to discuss their recommendations to the administration on the agency’s assessment of the science on particulate matter (PM) and health. The meeting continued the ongoing push and pull between the EPA, its science advisors, and the committee chair Dr. Tony Cox.

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Photo: Steven Buss/Flickr
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Taking Science Out of Air Pollution Protections

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

You and I enjoy cleaner air thanks to air pollution standards based on science. But now that could change. Last week, science advisors to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drafted a letter criticizing the agency’s use of science to set ambient air pollutant standards. This is the latest development in the EPA’s process to update the health protective standards for particulate matter and ozone—the two air pollutants most responsible for early death and sickness in this country. Read more >

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Photo: Eric Sonstroem/Flickr

Air Pollution from Vehicles in California: People of Color Bear the Biggest Burden

, Senior vehicles engineer

Cars, trucks, and buses are a significant source of air pollution in California. But how much pollution is attributable to these vehicles and who is exposed to this pollution? To help answer these questions, I’ve used a computer model to estimate the amount of fine particulate matter air pollution (known as PM2.5) created by using on-road vehicles (cars, trucks, and buses). The findings are troubling, both because they show that people of color are exposed to higher levels of harmful air pollution and because this result is likely not to be a surprise to many Californians (full report available in English and Spanish). The study supports the claims many have been making for decades – that on average, African American, Latino, and Asian Californians are exposed to more PM2.5 pollution from cars, trucks, and buses than white Californians. In fact, these groups are exposed to PM2.5 pollution 43, 39, and 21 percent higher, respectively, than white Californians.

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Photo: Eric Sonstroem/Flickr
Photo: Jimmy O'Dea
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Scientists to EPA: Stop Sidelining Science in the Air Pollution Standard Update for Particulate Matter

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

More than 200 air quality and public health experts have penned a letter expressing concern about the limited scientific input into an air pollutant standard update. The 206 scientists are deeply troubled by recent actions of the EPA on its update to the health-based standard for particulate matter, a pollutant comprised of tiny solid particles that has been linked to respiratory and cardiovascular effects and early death. Read more >

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