political interference in science


As Congress Revives its Oversight Responsibilities, Science Should Be on the Agenda

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

The midterms brought checks and balances to Washington, complete with new opportunities for accountability and oversight, and some members of Congress have already signaled that science will be on the agenda. Today, a diverse set of environmental, public health, and good government organizations released a report outlining what Congress can do to address recent actions that sideline science from policymaking. Read more >

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The Trump administration is using bogus science to justify restrictions on birth control access, building on a legacy of Presidential administrations' politicization of science around contraceptives. Photo: www.quotecatalog.com

The Trump Administration Fakes Science to Justify Restrictions on Birth Control Access

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

The Trump administration is using bogus science to justify restrictions on birth control access, building on a legacy of Presidential administrations’ politicization of science around contraceptives. Read more >

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Lessons for Fighting the Trump Administration’s Attacks on Science

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

With all the recent headlines about the Trump administration’s attacks on the government scientific enterprise—from dismissing scientists from advisory committees, to hiring untrained or conflicted heads of agencies, to blatant misinformation from administration officials—it can be difficult to think about the solutions. But we must. My new paper, out this week in Conservation Biology, does just that.  Read more >

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April 2017 Was the Second Hottest April on Record: We Need NOAA More Than Ever

, climate scientist

We are still seeing warming that is basically unprecedented. Read more >

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Gas wells sprinkled across the (in)famous Jonah Field, one of the richest natural gas deposits in North America. Since the early 1990s, fracking has allowed drillers to tap into otherwise inaccessible deposits, and this sagebrush-covered steppe in west-central Wyoming is expected to support more than 3,000 wells before it is played out (painting by Travis Ivey).

Behind the Carbon Curtain: How the Energy Corporatocracy Censors Science

Jeffrey Lockwood, , UCS

In my forthcoming book, Behind the Carbon Curtain, The Energy Industry, Political Censorship and Free Speech (University of New Mexico Press), I tell the stories of scientists, artists and teachers who have been silenced by the collusion of energy corporations and public officials. My purpose is to provide witness, to record events, to give voice—and in so doing to shift the balance of power ever so slightly to bring us closer to a tipping point of outrage and change. Read more >

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