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Skara Brae, Orkney. Adam Markham

A New Way to Assess Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Sites

, Deputy director, Climate & Energy

The stone-age village of Skara Brae, one of the world’s most important archaeological sites, is at high risk from climate change according to the results of a new impact assessment launched this week at the annual World Heritage Committee meeting.

Dr. Alistair Rennie from Scottish Natural Heritage and the Dynamic Coast project explains the processes of accelerated coastal erosion at Skara Brae, Orkney, to CVI workshop participants. Photo: Adam Markham

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Adam Markham
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Cushion plant community destroyed by Tasmanian wildfires in 2016. Each mound takes several hundred years to form. Photo: Dan Broun

It’s Time to Stop Ignoring the Climate Change Threat to World Heritage

, Deputy director, Climate & Energy

The World Heritage list comprises more than 1,000 of our planet’s most important natural and cultural heritage sites, but from the ancient city of Venice to the forests and rivers of Yellowstone National Park, these extraordinary places are increasingly vulnerable to climate change. Read more >

Dan Broun
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Aerial view of the great barrier reef in Australia
Great Barrier Reef. Photo: Lock the Gate Alliance (Flickr)

Climate Change is the Fastest Growing Threat to World Heritage

, Deputy director, Climate & Energy

Nineteen extraordinary places were added to UNESCO’s World Heritage list this week, including Buddhist temples in South Korea, the forests and wetlands that form the ancestral home of the Anishinaabeg people in Canada, and the ancient port city of Qalhat in Oman. But amongst all the congratulations and good feeling that comes with adding sites to list of the world’s most important places, there was little or no serious talk about the implications of climate change. Read more >

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Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina. Photo: NPS

If You Can’t Censor It, Bury It: DOI Tries to Make a Stark New Study on Rising Seas Invisible

, Deputy director, Climate & Energy

A new National Park Service (NPS) report is unequivocal that human-caused climate change has significantly increased the rate of sea level rise that is putting coastal sites at risk. But the study is difficult to find on the web and the report’s lead author, Maria Caffrey of the University of Colorado, says she had to fight to keep many scientific statements about climate change in the final version. Read more >

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