science and public policy


Mike Olliver

Expanding Professional Development Opportunities for Scientists Beyond the Lab

Lida Beninson, Senior Program Officer, and Tess Doezema, Doctoral Candidate in the Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology, , UCS

We live in an age where the world and its population seem fragile and vulnerable, yet at the same time, full of radical potential. Millions of people face life-threatening opioid addiction, the global climate continues to worsen, voting infrastructure has been compromised, and the security of our health and financial data has been undermined. On the plus side, alternative energy technologies are becoming cheaper and more widely adopted, our understanding of gravitational waves is unfolding, quantum computing is becoming a reality, and nearly every country in the world has agreed to achieve a set of ambitious sustainability goals. A thread connecting all of these issues, good and bad, is science policy. Read more >

Mike Olliver
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Ante la crisis fiscal, climática, y humanitaria, la comunidad científica boricua se moviliza para informar la política pública post-María

, Climate Vulnerability Social Scientist

Puerto Rico atraviesa por el momento más crítico de su historia ante el embate de la grave crisis fiscal y climática que devastó a la Isla hace un año tras el paso del Huracán María. De cara a la reconstrucción del territorio no incorporado de los Estados Unidos, los puertorriqueños dentro y fuera de la Isla exigen un lugar en la mesa donde se tomarán las decisiones que definirán el tipo de país en que les tocará vivir y al que ansiamos regresar. Read more >

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Using Science to Address Inaction, Not Just Uncertainty

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

In a recent article published in Nature, William Sutherland and his colleagues give 20 tips for interpreting scientific claims and suggest educating policy makers on “the imperfect nature of science”. Their tips are useful and perhaps should be cautious reminders on the desk of every scientist before they step forward to provide advice. But the tips can also mislead policymakers into failing to make a decision in the absence of unrealistic, and unattainable, absolute certainty. Read more >

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