science-based decision making


AP Photo/David Goldman

Report: When the Trump Administration Sidelines Science, Underserved Communities Face the Worst Consequences

, Research Analyst

As a public health researcher and a woman of color, I am acutely aware that in the United States some people live in communities which are afforded more science-based protections, allowing them to breath cleaner air, drink cleaner water, eat more nutritious food, and work at safer workplaces. And some people live in communities which are not afforded these protections. Read more >

AP Photo/David Goldman
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By Phasing Out Animal Testing, the EPA Could Turn You into the Guinea Pig

, Research Analyst

When you encounter chemicals in the normal course of your life—while eating food, drinking water, playing in the backyard, or breathing air—do you want the assurance that these chemicals have been deemed safe using the most rigorous scientific methods available? Of course you want that! But the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has just implemented a policy that has the real possibility of making this science less rigorous and less thorough. Read more >

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The Scientific Integrity Act and the Importance of Storytelling in Science Communication

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

My job regularly requires explaining complex science and policy topics to the media, public, and decisionmakers. So I took over the Union of Concerned Scientists’ twitter account (#GretchenTakeover) to share my top tips for talking about science in decisionmaking, examples of effective science communication, and suggestions for how to advocate for the Scientific Integrity Act.  Here are the key takeaways. Read more >

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Photo: aisletwentytwo/CC BY 2.0 (Flickr)

Is the USDA Relocation Just Good Old-Fashioned Rent Seeking?

, Economist

One of things I cherish about economists is their ability to call BS when they see it. In research settings economists tend to have a reputation for asking hard-hitting questions during seminars. They are known for having the most unpopular opinion and for being unabashedly proud of it. I’ve personally seen non-economists bristle at the thought of giving a talk to an economics-oriented audience. As someone who straddles the worlds of public health and economics I get it, trust me. I’ve been there. Read more >

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Photo: iStock.com//Alija

Vegetable Production in the US: Lots of Potatoes, More Kale, and Other Trends

, Economist

Vegetables—they’ve got me working overtime lately. That’s because my preschool-age daughter recently seems less than excited about these healthy foods. She’ll likely outgrow her (very common) picky-eater phase and enjoy vegetables. I hope.

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Map: USDA/NASS
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