Science For Justice


Houston Stop Asian Hate Vigil and Rally
Melody Tan

The Science Policy Community’s Responsibility to Address Anti-Asian Xenophobia

Christopher Tonnu Jackson, Ph.D. candidate in Chemistry at University of California, Berkeley, and Melody Tan, Ph.D. candidate in Bioengineering, Rice University, , UCS

As early-career Asian American scientists pursuing science policy professions, we have witnessed the weaponization of scientific research against people who share our heritage as our communities in the United States face the consequences of this rhetoric. 

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Melody Tan
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Marcia Cassidy Communications

Renewable Energy Technology is Not Fully Helping Communities That Need it Most

Carolyn E. Ramirez, Chemical Engineering Ph.D. Candidate, Northwestern University, , UCS

In the United States, renewable energy technology, like solar cells, is still mostly utilized by white populations when data show that communities of color are impacted most negatively by fossil fuel pollution and climate change. Read more >

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Nitish Meena/Unsplash

Celebrate the Nobel Prize Winning Immigrant Scientists — But Not at the Expense of the Greater Immigrant Community

Melody Tan, Ph.D. candidate in Bioengineering and Christopher Jackson, Ph.D. candidate in Chemistry, , UCS

We are scientists and engineers from immigrant families. Over the past year, we have watched as these identities have increasingly intersected amid federal attempts to end the DACA program, restrictions on Chinese researchers, and attacks on international students. However, when we hear our scientific societies and academic institutions take a stand in support of immigrants, it is usually a tired mantra that praises the contributions of only a select few immigrants.

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Nitish Meena/Unsplash
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Beginning a Courageous Journey: Connecting Science & Justice

Dr. Brian R. Shmaefsky, , UCS

One year after the Flint Water Crisis I was invited to participate in a water rights session at a conference hosted by the US Human Rights Network in Austin, Texas in 2015. The reason I was at the conference was to promote efforts by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to encourage scientists to shine a light on how science intersects with human rights, in the United States as well as in the context of international development. My plan was to sit at an information booth and share my stories about water quality projects I spearheaded in communities in Bangladesh, Colombia, and the Philippines. I did not expect to be thrown into conversations that made me reexamine how scientists use their knowledge as a public good. Read more >

Angie Chung/Flickr
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East Boston murals celebrating the community’s immigrant identity.

East Boston and Power: An Environmental Justice Community in Transition

John Walkey, Waterfront Initiative Coordinator, , UCS

En español

This is the first in a four-part blog series on East Boston, a Controversial Substation, and Opportunities for a Clean Energy Transition.  

Welcome to Eastie

Of all the neighborhoods of Boston, East Boston quite literally stands apart: physically separated from the rest of the city by Boston Harbor. Originally a collection of small islands, it was eventually merged into one land mass, and its northern shore was connected to the mainland through a land filling and development process in the late nineteenth century. The character of East Boston has been defined by its waterfront in two main ways: the industries that have thrived along its wharves, and the immigrants who passed from those docks to live in the neighborhood’s tightly packed blocks of triple-decker homes. Now in the 21st century, change is rippling across this waterfront community.

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Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, Boston Public Library.
John Walkey
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