#ScienceforPublicGood

Scientists have a critical role to play in holding the government accountable to its mission to protect the public good. This role can take a variety of forms, as there are many different ways to advocate for equitable, science-based decision making. This Science Network blog series explores how scientists are embracing opportunities to hold institutions accountable in using science for the public good.


For Effective Science Advocacy, Focus on Shared Values, and Speak Up Often

Sheeva Azma, , UCS

Let’s face it, it’s not possible to replace everyone in Congress with scientists and doctors (though, thinking about it, wouldn’t that be such a different world?). Nor need we—the depth of experience from our policymakers is what helps get stuff done in all facets of policy. The best way to hold the government accountable to its mission to protect the public good is for scientists to guide lawmakers to understand the importance of science research. Read more >

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Protect the Arctic Refuge youth rally in front of the Yukon legislative assembly. Katarzyna Nowak

Indigenous and Western Scientists and Knowledge Holders Partnering for the Public Good

Katarzyna Nowak, lecturer at University of Alberta / Yukon University; Jared Gonet, PhD student at University of Alberta / Yukon University., , UCS

We are two conservationists: a First Nations Yukoner and Canadian, and a first generation immigrant-settler with dual Poland-U.S. nationality. Our paths crossed through mutual interest in Indigenous-led stewardship, Two-Eyed Seeing, and holistic approaches like One Health. We are proponents of two-eyed seeing which means, “To see from one eye with the strengths of Indigenous ways of knowing, and to see from the other eye with the strengths of Western ways of knowing, and to use both of these eyes together”. With two-eyed seeing, it becomes easier to see, for example that the health of people, wildlife and our shared environments is so intertwined as to be one (“One Health”). 

We think that an exciting paradigm shift is underway that could transform how we engage with governments and other institutions for the public good.     Read more >

Katarzyna Nowak
Katarzyna Nowak
Katarzyna Nowak
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Censorship of Federal Environmental Agency Websites Under Trump: What We Learned and How to Protect Public Information Moving Forward

Gretchen Gehrke, Marcy Beck, Eric Nost, Shannan Lenke Stoll, , UCS

A review of thousands of web pages from federal agencies, including the EPA, NASA, and NOAA, found that the use of the term “climate change” decreased almost 40 percent between 2016 and 2020. Establishing better web governance policies is a central piece of regaining and retaining the public’s trust and restoring faith in the scientific integrity of federal agencies. Read more >

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A bike lane, an MBTA bus, and the Green Line trolley in Boston
Eleanor Fort/UCS

Why Scientists Shouldn’t Heed Calls to “Stay in Our Lane”

Ben Santer, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow, , UCS

It’s hard to lose a long-term friendship. That happened to me last year. My friendship did not survive my unwillingness to “stay in my lane”. Read more >

Eleanor Fort/UCS
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