Scientific Integrity


science committee hearing room 10-17-19

Scientific Integrity Act Passes Out of Committee with Unprecedented Bipartisan Support

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Today, the remarkable happened: the Scientific Integrity Act passed the House Science Committee with support from both Republicans and Democrats. Six Republicans joined all 19 Democrats in attendance to vote the Scientific Integrity Act out of Committee. This is the first time this kind of legislation has passed out of a House committee. This is also the first time this kind of legislation has received public support from Republicans still in office. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Randy Showstack/Eos

House Committee to Vote on Scientific Integrity Act

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

The House Science Committee just announced that it will amend and vote on the Scientific Integrity Act on Thursday at 10 am. This is the first time this kind of bill, which would protect the independence of science and scientists in federal government agencies, will receive a vote in the United States Congress. It is fantastic to see solid momentum and growing support in Congress for this good government legislation. Read more >

Randy Showstack/Eos
Bookmark and Share

AFGE/Flickr

Bringing Science Back to the EPA — Whether EPA Wants it or Not.

, president

The current administration’s attacks on both scientists and science are unprecedented, reaching a new low a few weeks ago when the White House Chief of Staff and the Secretary of Commerce attempted to stifle NOAA employees from giving the public accurate information about the path of Hurricane Dorian. Scientists within the federal government and across the country have struggled to find ways to make sure that their vital work continues in the face of such attacks.

Read more >

AFGE/Flickr
Bookmark and Share

Tesla, Edison, “The Current War,” and What it Has to Do With Getting to Work

, Senior energy analyst

Getting to work on time can be enough of a hassle, but imagine if there wasn’t an agreed standard time, or worse if we didn’t have agreement about which side of the street to drive on. This simple but vital task of getting to work on time would be a mess.  Standardizing time zones was a key step in getting trains to run on schedules.

Today’s technology also relies on standards. “Plug-and-play” might be overused, but every appliance and wall socket are designed to meet agreed standards and offer consumers trouble-free connection for electrical products.

Read more >

M. Jacobs
Bookmark and Share

The Indelible Ink of SharpieGate Spreads to NOAA Fisheries

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

The health of our oceans is profoundly impacted by global warming. Yet you wouldn’t know it from current NOAA Fisheries Director Chris Oliver. At a Senate hearing last week, he “could not say whether climate change is endangering the nation’s fisheries and declined to ‘speculate’ on whether warming oceans will harm fish stocks or generate more hurricanes,” reports E&E news. Read more >

C-SPAN
Bookmark and Share