Shell


Photo: Mike Mozart/Flickr

Shell Puts Trade Groups on Notice about Climate Policy

, climate accountability campaign director

Today, Royal Dutch Shell published its Industry Associations Climate Review, delivering on a promise made late last year to leading institutional investors who are concerned about climate change. Shell’s review follows a similar report published by BHP in late 2017, and raises the transparency bar for fossil fuel industry competitors and their trade groups. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Exxon refinery in Baytown, Texas.

Fossil Fuel Giants Are Pumping Out Greenwashing—Their Tricks Won’t Work

, climate accountability campaign director

In recent months, we’ve seen fossil fuel giant ExxonMobil leave the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), pledge $1 million to support a carbon tax, announce measures to reduce methane emissions, and join the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI). Is the company finally getting serious about addressing climate change? Um, no. We found that these companies still appear to be trying to trick us with greenwashing. Here are six tricks by ExxonMobil and some of its key competitors that we’re countering with our public exposure and organizing. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Shareholders Not Playing Games at Big Oil Annual General Meetings

, climate accountability campaign director

Major fossil fuel producers are holding their annual general meetings (AGMs) this month amid mounting pressure from investors, increasing risks of legal liability for climate damages, and heightened scrutiny of their lobbying and public policy advocacy. BP and Royal Dutch Shell host their AGMs this week; ExxonMobil and Chevron will follow next week.

If shareholder meetings were classic game shows, and investors were keeping score, fossil fuel companies would be coming up short. Read more >

©corlaffra/Shutterstock.com
Bookmark and Share

Shell sign in gas station
Photo: David Nagy CC-BY-SA-2.0 (Flickr)

Shell Knew About Climate Risks Since the 1980s, Will it Act Now?

, climate accountability campaign director

The year is 1988. The Wonder Years debuts on TV, George Michael’s “Faith” tops the Billboard charts, gas costs $1.67 at the pump, the U.S. Surgeon General states that the addictive properties of nicotine are similar to those of heroin and cocaine, and Royal Dutch Shell writes a confidential report on climate science and its own role in global warming. This report is one of dozens of internal documents unearthed by journalist Jelmer Mommers of De Correspondent and posted this week on Climate Files that shed more light on what Shell knew decades ago about the risks of burning fossil fuels. Read more >

David Nagy
Bookmark and Share

Shell Leaves ALEC, Improves Consistency on Climate Lobbying

, former science communication officer

Shell has told several journalists that it will sever ties with the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a U.S.-based lobbying group that spreads misinformation about climate science and tries to roll back clean energy polices. According to Shell, ALEC’s stance on climate change “is clearly inconsistent with our own.”

It’s not often that you hear science policy advocates say things like, “Woohoo!” but this one of them. (Another was earlier this week, when the EPA finalized its Clean Power Plan.) Read more >

Bookmark and Share