unconventional oil and gas development


Photo: Tim Evanson/Wikimedia Commons

Trump Administration Rescinds Fracking Rule for Public Lands: A Blow to Public Protection

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

At the end of last month, we saw yet another casualty in the Trump administration’s war on science-based policy. The administration announced it would rescind a 2015 rule at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to address risks associated with unconventional oil and gas development on public land. Though not unexpected, this move was disheartening. The 2015 BLM fracking rule was an important step in protecting people from many unchecked risks associated with hydraulic fracturing. To understand what we lost, let me quickly review the national setting back in 2015 when the rule was issued. Read more >

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What’s Been Going On with the EPA’s Fracking Report?

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

During Sunday’s Democratic presidential debate in Flint, Michigan, Sarah Bellaire, a student at the University of Michigan at Dearborn, asked the candidates if they support fracking. Read more >

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The Colorado Oil and Gas Task Force: Still a Chance for Science to Inform Fracking Policy

, , Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

When news broke last month that the state of Colorado would be creating a blue-ribbon task force to study the impacts and inform regulation of hydraulic fracturing in the state, I wrote about the opportunity for science. In a state that has been ground zero in the fracking debate in many ways, this is a chance, I wrote, for Colorado to take a step back and consider how science can better inform oil and gas development there. Unfortunately, yesterday’s announcement of the task force membership shows this has yet to be the case. Read more >

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The Colorado Hydraulic Fracturing Deal: Amidst Politics, A Chance for Science

, , Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

News broke this week of a controversial deal in Colorado around hydraulic fracturing. In exchange for the withdrawal of four ballot propositions (two promoting oil and gas development and two regulating it), the state agreed to convene a blue-ribbon panel of stakeholders to discuss how the state should handle oil and gas development. The panel will make policy recommendations to the state legislature and Governor Hickenlooper early next year. What does this mean for fracking in Colorado? Read more >

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How Disclosure Changed a Conversation on Fracking (And Why that Matters)

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Last week, I moderated a session on fracking at the annual fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). The event went as we planned with seven speakers presenting their work on unconventional oil and gas development, but after the formal talks when we opened a panel discussion with questions from the audience, something unexpected happened. Read more >

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