water


Photo: Caltrans

What Climate Change Could Mean for the Future of California’s Springtime Snowpack

, Senior Climate Scientist

Despite the abundant water year we’ve had, over the long term climate change is transforming the California snowpack and will make no-snow snow surveys more common in the future. Not only is climate change making good snow years like this one less likely, it’s also changing what good snow years mean for our water resources. And that’s going to mean a very different April snow survey in the future. Read more >

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Water in an Uncertain Future: Planning the New Normal

, director, California & Western States

Northern California breathed a sigh of relief this weekend as rain and cooler temperatures finally arrived in force after the devastating fires in October. Now the question is, what kind of a winter will we have, and in particular, how much snow and rain will we or will we not get?

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Ivette Perfecto and John Vandermeer in a shaded coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico. They use diverse shaded coffee as a model system to study ecological complexity and its implications for farm management and biodiversity conservation.

Agroecology to the Rescue: 7 Ways Ecologists are Working Toward Healthier Food Systems

, senior scientist

A lot has been written about agroecology, and a new special issue of the journal Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems takes it to the next level. Read more >

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Come El Niño or La Niña, Climate Change is La Madre of Weather Systems

, climate scientist

It’s getting close to that time of year when weather watchers and water managers start wringing their hands and wondering whether it will be a boy or a girl. The boy is none other than El Niño – that Pacific weather pattern characterized by warm ocean temperatures and heavy precipitation. Last year, we heard all about the monster El Niño that would refill California’s reservoirs. But it never actually materialized. Now, the National Weather Service projects a different winter visitor – La Niña. She’s the opposite of her brother – a weather pattern characterized by dry conditions. Get ready for the headlines: Miserly La Niña steals our water! Read more >

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Anchorage Event a Great Warm-Up for Fort Lauderdale

Dr. Colin Polsky, Director
, , UCS

While the Arctic Council normally meets at a table with only eight chairs, the US has invited world leaders, researchers, and media to a party that promises to be standing room only. Read more >

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