White House


The Senate Will Accelerate Kelvin Droegemeier’s White House Science Advisor Nomination. That’s a Good Thing.

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Try not to breathe too easily, but the Senate is in fast drive mode to consider the nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the White House Office and Science and Technology Policy. And well it should. These days, this is one nomination we should all be excited about, as this Superman of science policy is sorely needed in the White House.

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EPA office building with agency flag
Photo: EPA

Did EPA Consult With The Chemical Industry While Working To Suppress A Scientific Study On PFAS?

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

Today, members of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a letter to EPA requesting more information about a meeting with an industry trade group, the American Chemistry Council (ACC), attended by Richard Yamada, the Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Research and Development. Read more >

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Dude, Where’s My Car (Charging Station)? How Public Charging Is a Centerpiece of a U.S. Department of Transportation Initiative

, senior policy and legal analyst, Clean Vehicles

There are nearly 15,000 public charging stations for electric vehicles in the U.S., but there hasn’t been a great way to navigate to those spots without an app or internet access – until now. Read more >

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Thawing Permafrost: Why It Matters

, senior climate scientist

In these recent hot summer days, as my colleague Xinnan Zhu was walking outside exposed to the outdoor temperature of nearly 100°F, she felt like she was going to melt like an ice cube under the sun. Read more >

Photo by Xinnan Zhu
International Permafrost Association, 1998. Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS), version 1.0.
Figure created by Xinnan Zhu in July, 2016.
NASA GISS data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/maps
Figure created by Xinnan Zhu from data in IPCC AR5
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Carbon Capture, Water, and the U.S.-China Climate Agreement

, , senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

The just-announced U.S.-China climate agreement is reason to celebrate—it’s a, as UCS’s Ken Kimmell puts it, “truly historic agreement” and “a welcome breakthrough.” For those with an interest in energy-water connections and collisions, the agreement commits both countries to a project focused on reducing the negative water implications of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Here’s why we’re even talking about water around CCS, and what this accord says about that the issue. Read more >

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