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Posts Tagged ‘sea level rise’

Climate Reality Must Win Out Over Political Attacks on Science

This summer’s heat has been brutal. A surprisingly early June heat wave broke records in the Western United States. The heat sent people to emergency rooms and stoked wildfires that destroyed homes and lives. Europe and Asia have suffered recent dangerous heat waves, too.  Wildfire season in the U.S. West—fueled by extreme heat and water stress—is nearly two months longer than in the 1970s. Read More

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Rising Seas and Worsening Storms Require Rethinking Flood and Wind Insurance

In a world with rising seas and worsening storms, we’ve got to get smarter about how and where we build along our coasts. A new UCS report released today points out that our government-backed flood and wind insurance programs are encouraging risky coastal development that exposes coastal communities to harm and creates the potential for large damage costs paid for by all taxpayers. Local examples of policies that create risk are unfortunately common too: recently, New Jersey policy makers passed a bill that would allow development on piers in coastal high hazard areas, putting more people and property in harm’s way. Read More

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Ready or Not: Hurricane Season in a Warming World

Here on the East Coast, the arrival of hurricane season means something very different in 2013 than ever before. It reminds us: catastrophes like Hurricane Sandy are possible. It warns us: if you’re on the coast, you could face grave risk. And it asks: are you ready? Read More

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Preparing for Our Future: The Need for Monitoring and Data Collection

Last week I attended the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Science Policy conference with this year’s theme of “Preparing for our Future.” The second annual conference seeks to bridge the gap between science and policy (a mission UCS strongly believes in). I learned a lot of new information about policy on diverse scientific topics—from ocean acidification to carbon sequestration to asteroids impacting Earth—but one thing I learned really took me by surprise. Read More

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Today’s “King Tides” Preview the Future of Sea Level Rise

If you’ve been wondering what sea level will look like with ongoing climate change, head to the coast during a “king tide,” the highest tide of the year. This weekend extreme high tides are happening in a number of places along the U.S. East Coast, including Florida, New Jersey, and Maryland. Grab your camera and join the fray! Read More

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Birthplace of American Democracy Faces Threat from Accelerating Sea Level Rise

The National Park Service is having to take urgent action to protect Jamestown — the birthplace of representative government in America — from accelerating sea level rise. Read More

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Military and Civilians Alike are Battling Sea Level Rise in Tidewater Virginia

You need only drive down Messick Road in the Virginia tidewater town of Poquoson to get a sense of how vulnerable this whole region is to flooding and rising sea levels.

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Climate Debate Stuck in a Washington Rut

The climate debate in Washington is stuck in a rut. Last week, we saw politicians playing another round of the climate change blame game. This time the topic was tornadoes. But connections between extreme weather and climate change are a scientific question, not a political one. Read More

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Talking About Sea Level Rise: Leading Scientists Meet in Galveston, Texas

What better place to talk about the impacts of sea level rise than a coastal city on a barrier island on the Gulf Coast? That’s where I was two weeks ago – in Galveston, Texas, with 80 other Earth scientists at a conference sponsored by the Geological Society of America and the American Geophysical Union. Galveston was the site of the worst natural disaster in U.S. history, more than a century ago. Read More

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Coastal Communities on the Front Lines of Sea Level Rise and Flooding: Convening a Conversation

Last week, almost six months after Hurricane Sandy came ashore to devastating effect, UCS convened a multi-state roundtable on the growing risks from sea level rise, storm surges, and flooding. Officials from Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, and Virginia, together with a representative from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, came together to talk about what they are doing to help protect their communities from these risks and what future steps may be needed to build resilience. Read More

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